Woodland Indians Forum

You are not logged in.

Announcement

#1 Dec-22-2019 03:20:pm

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4390

Delaware Tribe of Indians to skip meeting with Elizabeth Warren

Delaware Tribe of Indians to skip meeting with Elizabeth Warren

By Jess Bidgood Globe Staff,December 21, 2019, 8:33 p.m.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/ … story.html

A representative from the Delaware Tribe of Indians said on Saturday evening its tribal council had decided not to attend a meeting with Senator Elizabeth Warren set for Sunday in her home state of Oklahoma, and cited her past claims of Native American heritage as part of their reasoning.

Nicky Kay Michael, a member of the tribal council , said the tribe’s chief had been invited to the meeting, but the governing body had decided it was not in their interest to go.

“She’s made these claims. We don’t know her. Personally, we wish her all the best — nobody’s bashing her," said Michael, who is a professor of indigenous studies. “What we’re saying is, ‘We don’t want to be involved with it.’"

Warren’s campaign invited numerous tribal representatives to meet with the Senator on Sunday in Tulsa — a meeting that was first reported by the Washington Post. It is one of multiple meetings and events Warren has held with Native Americans over the course of her presidential campaign after her previous claims of Cherokee and Delaware ancestry — and her use of a DNA test last year to prove it — fueled discomfort among some Native and progressive activists.
“Being native is really strongly about who claims you," Michael said. “It’s not necessarily about what you claim."

Warren’s campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The Massachusetts Democrat has made a point of reaching out to Native Americans over the course of her presidential campaign, and she has held private meetings with tribal leaders in Minnesota, Seattle, Phoenix and more.

The Globe reported that she had one of those meetings with the late Frank LaMere, a member of the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska, after her very first campaign stop in Council Bluffs, Iowa; her most recent private meeting with tribal leaders was on Friday in Los Angeles.

Warren’s heritage claims been uncomfortable political territory ever since her first Senate campaign in 2012, when she was revealed to have identified herself as Native American in some academic directories. A Boston Globe investigation found that Warren’s claims never helped her career or propelled her remarkable rise through academia to a Harvard professorship.

Warren has described distant Indian ancestry as an indelible part of her family history, passed down through generations, but the claim has been ridiculed by Republicans, both in that race and more recently by President Trump, who has referred to her with an ethnic slur and called her a “fake."

In the fall of 2018, Warren sought to prove her claims with a video that showed her getting the results of a DNA test that showed she likely has a very small amount of indigenous ancestry. The video bothered some Native Americans who are deeply opposed to the use of such tests to prove heritage, and the secretary of state for the Cherokee Nation denounced the move in a widely circulated statement.

Later, she apologized privately to the Cherokee Nation for causing any “confusion" about a tribe’s right to determine who its members are — but Michael said her tribe did not hear from Warren at the time.

Warren has prominent Native American supporters, including Representative Deb Haaland, the New Mexico Democrat who is one of the first Native American women elected to Congress. Her sweeping policy proposal for Indian Country, released in August, drew wide praise.

Days later, she attended a forum organized by Native Americans in Sioux City, Iowa, and offered her first public apology for her claims. “I am sorry for the harm I have caused," she said. “I have listened and I have learned a lot."

Some Native Americans who attended that event said they considered the issue settled. “I don’t think it’s a major concern to Native Americans in our area," Frank White, the chairman of the Winnebago Tribe, said at the time.

But the looming meeting underscores how this issue is still fraught for others.

Michael cited three reasons for the Delaware Tribe of Indians’ decision not to attend the meeting. She said they were not sure as of Saturday where and when the meeting would be, and that they were not inclined to involve themselves with a political campaign.

Michael also said the tribe has struggled with the past with people making dubious claims about being Delaware, and they have “disclaimed" those people.
“Warren falls in line with those that are making these claims but have no clear evidence," she said.

Michael added that members of the tribe are frustrated Warren has claimed Delaware heritage but not been involved in the Delaware Tribe of Indian’s struggles to get land into trust and deal with federal recognition.

“She’s had no involvement with our tribe in the past. That’s not to say she couldn’t in the future," Michael said. “If she wanted to form that relationship, we could probably welcome her."

Offline

 

#2 Dec-23-2019 06:41:am

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11117

Re: Delaware Tribe of Indians to skip meeting with Elizabeth Warren

Personally, I can't stand Warren and this makes me smile haha!

Offline

 

#3 Jan-10-2020 11:58:am

Newallike
Visitor
Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 62

Re: Delaware Tribe of Indians to skip meeting with Elizabeth Warren

If Elizabeth Warren wants to prove her sincerity, she could at least get my attention if she were to make a statement such as I post below, on a national scale like a televised debate.  When she is called 'Pocahantas', she should jump in with both feet and make a meaningful statement about the condition of native peoples in the United States and how she is willing to help.

                                                                                   Narrative for Elizabeth Warren

    I am not now speaking as a Native American.  I am speaking for Native Americans, something I should have done a long time ago.

    I won’t waste one word walking backward, talking about my heritage issue.  I will speak many words talking about what was done to the Native Americans in the past and what we should be doing with the Native Americans in the future.

    First, let’s start with the Treaty of Fort Pitt, the very first treaty between the newly declared as independent, United States of America and the Delaware Nation.  This treaty provided that for safe passage through Delaware territory for the Americans pursuing the British to and through Detroit they would be allowed to form the 14th state in the Union when the war was over.  Further, this would be an Indian state with a seat in Congress occupied by a Delaware Indian. 

    As a result, the war was won by the Americans.  The Indian state was not allowed to come to fruition.  The Delaware Indian, White Eyes, who promoted the idea was quickly murdered and members of his clan of Christian Indians were also murdered by Pennsylvania militiamen at Gnadenhutten, Ohio shortly thereafter, ending any discussion about an Indian state.

    The treaty history between the United States and the Native Americans is absolutely abysmal and highly embarrassing for me standing here as an Okie, a resident of Oklahoma where the Native peoples were herded along the well-known Trail of Tears.  We never gave them a seat in Congress.  We never gave them a voice of any kind in our newly formed Republic. 

        That was wrong.

    Second, and far more important, is to visit the issue of Treaty Law and how we, as a new nation founded on liberty and justice for all, came to believe that we had the God given right to take land occupied by others for thousands of years.

    This assumed right to take land occupied by others was in fact, God given.  At least in the eyes of the early explorers sent to this continent to dominate or destroy any non-Christian peoples.  This mandate was given by Papal Bulls, by many popes, to go ashore with the flag and the cross and claim the land in the name of God and King.  These bulls, directives for all the explorers came to be known, in Indian country, as the Doctrines of Christian Discovery.

        This was also wrong.

        I pledge here and now to be that voice that was never given.  I also pledge to revisit the laws that were broken by the United States during the many years we dealt with the Native Americans using the treaty process to obtain the lands needed, and ultimately taken. 

    I don’t know what can be done to rectify the wrongs committed in the name of God and country, but today I pledge to the Native peoples of the United States, that I will try and do what I can, whether I win this election or not.

        I invite you to watch me and hold me accountable.

    Thank you.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

Offline

 

#4 Jan-10-2020 05:39:pm

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4390

Re: Delaware Tribe of Indians to skip meeting with Elizabeth Warren

Why not have ANY candidate use a similar narrative?  Unless I missed it, Joachin Castro, who is indisputably part-Indian, didn't do it when he was in the race; nor has anyone else, so far as I know.

Offline

 

#5 Jan-14-2020 10:32:am

Newallike
Visitor
Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 62

Re: Delaware Tribe of Indians to skip meeting with Elizabeth Warren

I agree. 

Any candidate should use a similar narrative.  Will they?  I doubt it, but I did contact the reporter at the Globe, with no response.  Today, I sent a slightly altered narrative to a reporter and editor at Bloomberg News in response to an article they wrote.  The altered narrative is included below.

Let' watch the debate tonight and see if it gets through to her and she makes a statement of any kind.  If she ignores this narrative, Bernie Sanders will be next, he is after all, in the Delaware seat!

                                             ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Misyrlena and Wendy,

I am writing in response to the article titled Warren Tries to Ease Iowan's Concerns About Electability.  I am a member of the Delaware Nation and I have a solution for Elizabeth Warren's Indian heritage dilemma.  Were she to resolve that issue, in the manner I describe, she could also make huge strides to win over the Latino and Black vote.

There is a growing, but cautious, desire to accept Elizabeth Warren's apology and see what she is willing to do to rectify the situation.  More meaningless promises about funds that will never arrive is not what she needs to promise.  She needs to promise to have a dialogue on a national stage about the two points included in this suggested narrative.  There is tentative agreement that if she were to make a statement like the one below, she could endear herself not only to the Delaware and Cherokee, but all Native Nations in our country. 

I don't know how to get this to her, hopefully before the next debate, where she could insert them into the discussion by telling Bernie Sanders he is in the Indian State seat.  Maybe you do know how to get it to her, and maybe you will.  I have sent this to her campaign, the Des Moines Register and others that may have an interest.
Thank you in advance.

Best,
Gerard F. Heath
Member Delaware Nation

                                                                            Narrative for Elizabeth Warren to Native America

    I am not now speaking as a Native American.  I am speaking for Native Americans, something I should have done a long time ago.

    I won’t waste one word walking backward, talking about my heritage issue.  I will speak many words talking about what was done to the Native Americans in the past and what we should be doing with the Native Americans in the future.

    First, let’s start with the Treaty of Fort Pitt, the very first treaty between the newly declared as independent, United States of America and the Delaware Nation.  This treaty provided that for safe passage through Delaware territory for the Americans pursuing the British to and through Detroit they would be allowed to form the 14th state in the Union when the war was over.  Further, this would be an Indian state with a seat in Congress occupied by a Delaware Indian.
 
    As a result, the war was won by the Americans.  The Indian state was not allowed to come to fruition.  And, interestingly enough, Vermont became the 14th state instead.  I believe Mr. Sanders is in their seat!

    The treaty history between the United States and the Native Americans is absolutely abysmal and highly embarrassing for me standing here as an Okie, a resident of Oklahoma where the Native peoples were herded along the well-known Trail of Tears.  We never gave them a seat in Congress.  We never gave them a voice of any kind in our newly formed Republic.

        That was wrong.
 
    Second, and far more important, is to visit the issue of Treaty Law and how we, as a new nation founded on liberty and justice for all, came to believe that we had the God given right to take land occupied by others for thousands of years.  This assumed right to take land occupied by others was in fact, God given.  At least in the eyes of the early explorers sent to this continent to dominate or destroy any non-Christian peoples.  This mandate was given by Papal Bulls, by many popes, to go ashore with the flag and the cross and claim the land in the name of God and King.  These bulls, directives for all the explorers came to be known, in Indian country, as the Doctrines of Christian Discovery.

         This was also wrong.

         I pledge here and now to be that voice that was never given.  I also pledge to revisit the laws that were broken by the United States during the many years we dealt with the Native Americans using the treaty process to obtain the lands needed, and ultimately taken.

    I don’t know what can be done to rectify the wrongs committed in the name of God and country, but today I pledge to the Native peoples of the United States, that I will try and do what I can, whether I win this election or not. 

        I invite you to watch me and hold me accountable.

    Thank you.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

Offline

 

Board footer

Powered by PunBB
© Copyright 2002–2005 Rickard Andersson