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#1 Jun-14-2017 04:21:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4344
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Lightfoot Talking Eagle

Anyone ever hear of this fellow?  He was living in Tamaqua, Pennsylvania in 1964.

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#2 Jun-19-2017 08:10:am

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11096

Re: Lightfoot Talking Eagle

I can't place the name but I think he was EDN. Maybe Blacksmith would know?

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#3 Jun-28-2017 01:14:am

Suckachsinheet
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Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 968

Re: Lightfoot Talking Eagle

Don't recall hearing that name. 1964 was about 30 years before I got involved.


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#4 Jul-13-2019 02:58:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4344
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Re: Lightfoot Talking Eagle

Two years have passed since I asked this question, here.  Someone had asked me about him.  This fellow had written a letter in 1964 and I post it, below.  I have removed the name of the person to whom it was addressed, for privacy reasons.

https://cdn1.imggmi.com/uploads/2019/7/13/a737bb55b3fbbbb7621933f64ae0c129-full.jpg upload

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#5 Jul-13-2019 03:05:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4344
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Re: Lightfoot Talking Eagle

This was my reply to the person who asked me about him.  Again, that person's name is removed from this copy, for the reason stated above.

Raymond Whritenour
Wed 6/14/2017

Hi,

Thank you for sending me this letter from a character calling himself "Lightfoot Talking Eagle."  Whether or not this guy was an Indian or not (and I doubt that he was), everything he told --------, in this letter, is incorrect. 

Mahoning is a straightforward Delaware Indian (Lenape) placename, meaning "at the salt-lick."  It is not a corruption of anything resembling "Ma-hochk-hoh-nee-wing-ga," supposedly meaning, 'the big or broad valley upon which the sun of tranquility or composure shines.'  Both this supposed Indian name and its translation had to have been invented by the letter's author.

The Susquehannock and the Lenape were two entirely different peoples.  Their languages were as different as English and Chinese; and, their cultures had significant differences.

There is no way anyone (and especially this fellow) could know what family or clan lived at Tamaqua in pre-contact times.  This is all a product of this man's imagination. 

Tamaqua is another straightforward Lenape word meaning, "beaver."  It is not a corruption of some crazy word, Tah-noh-mochk-hah-neh-nochk, supposedly meaning, 'the land or place of the animals that build lodges in the waters, or the land of the beavers."  This guy manufactured this name, no doubt, from his faulty memory of John Heckewelder's name for the Little Beaver Creek, which was Tank-amochk-hanne, and then the letter-writer added the -nochk on the end, thinking it would mean "land of."  It's ridiculous. 

His last, long paragraph is total baloney.  None of what he says bears any resemblance to any Lenape beliefs, whatsoever.  He has made up all of it.  He's just another con-artist trying to deceive the public with his line of B.S.

Unfortunately, many of his kind still exist, today. 

I would keep the letter, though; simply to document an example of the kind of snake-oil salesmen who were around in the '60's. 

Thank you, again, for sharing this with me.

Ray Whritenour
LENAPE TEXTS & STUDIES

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