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#101 Mar-10-2018 08:16:am

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 60

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

sschkaak wrote:

Can't see anything and the link doesn't work for me.  Most of us used to use Photobucket, but they've really screwed us, lately--charging crazy prices for what used to be free of charge.  Anyway, I've started using Flickr and posting their links to pictures.  I don't know how to embed them in a post, here.

Click the link below to to to a 'letter to the editor' of the  Herald-Star Newspaper by Rev. Werner Lange who attended the Remembrance at the Park in Gnaddenhutten on March 8th.  It contains one typo, he says the massacre occurred 226 years ago and it was 236 years ago.  He definitely knows the difference.  He was quite outspoken about the atrocity and he gives a good account of what was actually being lived out by the Delaware and the Moravians.  He has also agreed to help in any way he can to erect a cross at this site, which he maintains, is long overdue.

http://www.heraldstaronline.com/opinion … -realized/


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#102 Mar-10-2018 08:34:am

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
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Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Another effort by the Rev. Werner Lange, with all our thanks!


Dear Cleveland Indians staff,

As you may know, March 8th marked the 236th anniversary of the brutal massacre of 96 pacifist Christian Native Americans in Gnadenhutten (“Sanctuaries of Grace� ), a sacred site just about 100 miles south of Progressive Field.
At yesterday’s moving commemoration of that American tragedy, Lenape Native American representatives announced plans to at least dignify this historic site with placement of a large cross by the mound containing the corpses of the slaughtered Indians.
As a corporation which has reaped enormous financial benefits from the marketing of the insulting “Chief Wahoo�  symbol and name “Indians� , you are strongly encouraged to contribute to this important effort. Please contact the coordinator of the
Gnadenhutten Museum and/or the pastor of the Gnadenhutten Moravian Church for further details about how you can assist making the erection of a dignified cross at this site a reality. Please also share this message with the appropriate decision makers.
Thank you.


Sincerely,
Rev. Dr. Werner Lange


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#103 Mar-10-2018 09:45:am

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
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Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Based on the suggestion of Rev. Werner Lange, here is my effort to contact the Cleveland Indians Charities group.


My name is Gerard Heath.  I am a current member of the Moravian Band of the Delaware Indians, now known as the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown.

March 8th 2018, was the 236th anniversary of the Gnadenhutten Massacre of the Moravian Delaware Indians.  If you do not know, Gnadenhutten is the oldest existing settlement in the state of Ohio.  The remains of these 96 Christian Indians lay exposed to the forest animals and the weather for over 15 years before being piled in a mass grave called the Burial Mound for the Christian Indian Martyrs.  The Ohio Historical Society erected a marker at the site that calls the Gnadenhutten Massacre of March 8th 1782 a National Day of Shame.

My great great grandfather, Christian Moses Stonefish, dedicated the obelisk that stands in the Gnadenhutten Historical Park, erected as a memorial in 1872, and it is my family interred in that burial mound.  It is for this reason I am trying to raise awareness of the day and to raise funds to erect a Christian Cross at the burial mound and erect wrought iron fencing around other appropriate areas in the park.

We are thankful that Chief Wahoo is being removed from your uniforms next year but I would like you to go one step further.  As a show of good faith, and in an effort to make amends, it would be a great public relations effort if the Cleveland Indians donated the money to erect the cross and wrought iron fencing.

I have gone over your website, particularly your 'Diversity Advisory Board' section and was disappointed to see many minority groups represented such as the National Society of Hispanic MBAs, the National Black MBA Association, the Ohio Latino Affairs Commission, and others but no representation from the Native American community.  I am also sure that this is something you want to resolve and if I can help in any way, please let me know.

Follow this link to a YouTube video that tells the story of the massacre and speaks to my request to erect a Christian Cross.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yg0-ME64L64&t=1s  A Cross for Gnadenhutten

Please contact me for details about the site or the massacre and how the Cleveland Indians can get involved in preserving and promoting this sacred site. 

Tax deductible deductions can be sent to:

The Gnadenhutten Historical Society - Christian Cross Project

c/o John Heil

156 Spring St.

Gnadenhutten, Ohio  44629

Thank you for considering my request and may God bless you for your support of these Wilderness Christians.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#104 Jun-21-2018 08:15:pm

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 60

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Today is June 21st and I am sitting in a campground near Gnadenhutten, Ohio.  It has been over 3 months since my last post after the Remembrance at the Park held on March 8th, the anniversary date of the Gnadenhutten massacre, and I am here to begin the process of installing a cross at the burial mound.

I met with the Tribal Council at Moraviantown on May 16th to discuss the cross, some human remains at the park, and the possibility of the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown getting involved in the effort of the Ohio Historical Connection to interpret the massacre site for visitors.

While I wait for the tribe to respond, I intend to take the bull by the horns and begin the installation process.  Over $5k has been raised for the cross and I will begin to spend that money preparing the site for the installation.  I have to establish a respectable perimeter around the mound, and see about getting a foundation poured to receive the cross when finished.

If anything of note occurs over the next few days while I am at the park, I will post it here as there seems to be a silent interest in this endeavor on this forum.  Since March 8th, there have been almost 20,000 reads on this thread. 

For those interested in this thread, you should also pay attention to the other thread on this History page titled, "The first treaty between the US and an Indian nation still matters."  I maintain that the Gnadenhutten Massacre was due to the Delaware signing the Fort Pitt Treaty and being promised entry into the new United States as the 14th state.  The Delaware held up their end of the treaty and the United States broke that treaty as well as every other treaty they ever had with an Indian Nation.

Follow that thread as well as I develop that thought.

Getting dark and the mosquitoes are beginning to bite around the campsite so I will put it away for now.  More to come.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#105 Jun-24-2018 09:17:am

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 60

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Today is June 24th, St. John's Day, and I have been at the Gnadenhutten Historical Park & Museum for the last two days.  I'm camping nearby and coming to the park each day to volunteer my services around the place and I have had the opportunity to meet many fine people.

I was very happy to see, upon my arrival, that the efforts have already begun to establish a respectable perimeter around the mound to keep drivers and pedestrians back about 10' from the base of the mound.  The sidewalk that actually touched the burial mound has been removed and grass is growing to fill in where the sidewalk was and drivers have been moved back and grass is filling in on all sides.  Previously, gravel touched the mound on two sides and has been replaced by green grass and it looks great, a 100% turnaround since my last visit.  My thanks and gratitude go out to all the folks in Gnadenhutten who made this happen, particularly John Heil, curator of the museum who works tirelessly at the park daily as a volunteer!

We have been working for the last two days tearing out cabinets and sinks in the concession area and replacing them with updated fixtures.  In the process, we discovered that the wiring was sub par and not up to code so we fixed that at the same time.  I'll be here for a day or two more to get the concession area refurbished but that is not the story I want to tell.  The story I find interesting at this place is the visitors that come daily to walk around the park and tour the museum and the cabins where the massacre took place. 

On Saturday, it fell to me to help out at the museum and lead a few tours around the grounds.  This was a great experience to actually talk to the visitors and learn what they know, and do not know, about the Gnadenhutten Massacre.  One of the line items I put before the Delaware Nation Tribal Council on May 16th was the need for interpretive signage, at least, around the park so visitors can read and know what occurred there.  To a person, they were fascinated, and horrified, by the tale told about the massacre of these gentle Christian souls and they were surprised that there was no information available to visitors out in the park.

The most surprising visitor that came to the park while I was working was Chief Denise Stonefish from the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown.  I thought my eyes were playing tricks on me as she approached me and said, "Hello Gerard, nice to see you again."  After both of us expressing surprise to find each other at the park at the same time we had a discussion about why she was there.  She was around the area on personal business and decided to come over to the park to look over the various line items I left with the council in May to make her own determination.  As we spoke, a car pulled up over the grass and right up to the chain barrier erected to keep people from actually driving up on the burial mound.  She got to see first hand what the problem was and thought that the perimeter needed to be established sooner rather than later.

Each night before retiring I build a fire near the mound and make a tobacco offering and pray that the next steps are carefully taken to erect a cross at the burial mound.  I call it 'smudging the mound'.  I place two bricks side by side at the base of the mound, upwind, and then place a piece of burning wood on the bricks so as not to burn the grass, and finally I place four twists of tobacco on the burning embers and the tobacco smoke rolls over the mound.  To my surprise, it actually acted like a lawn sprinkler with the wind shifting and spreading smoke over the mound from side to side.  The smoke seemed to hug the mound as it went up the mound and down the other side before being blown away and the odor carried to the Creator.   To be the only one in the park at midnight performing this Midsummer Night ritual was awesome in every sense of the word!

Today is another day and as I begin pulling wire, I look forward to what comes next.









,


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#106 Jun-24-2018 11:47:am

sschkaak
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Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Thanks for that post, Gerard.  Wish I could have been there.

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#107 Jun-25-2018 08:26:am

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 60

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

You are most welcome! 

It is now Monday morning and I'm looking out past the burial mound towards the obelisk and the reconstructed cabins where the massacre took place as I load my vehicle to head for home.  The electrician got called away yesterday and as a result I spent the bulk of the day trimming trees and carrying brush.  The place looks great! 

I feel much progress was made toward the installation of a cross at the burial mound, of course not as much as I would have liked, but things are falling into place. 

It is my hope and prayer that the visit of Chief Denise Stonefish this  past weekend will lead to the involvement of the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown in doing a Lenape interpretation of this site aided by the Ohio Historical Connection.

We'll see.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#108 Aug-16-2018 01:38:pm

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
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Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Pioneer Days in Gnadenhutten  August 3-5 2018

It has been nearly two weeks since I attended the annual Pioneer Days celebration in Gnadenhutten, Ohio.  It was the first time I have attended this event as it is celebrating a space in time that occurred long after the Moravian Delaware had a presence there.  The times depicted are circa 1840 and the Moravian Indian Massacre, ending our presence there, took place in 1782.   

Regardless, when I was invited by John Heil, curator of the  Gnadenhutten Historical Park & Museum, to come and say a few words to the campers and attendees about the Cross for Gnadenhutten Project, I accepted and did attend Saturday and Sunday.  John has done so much for the Cross Project and as a volunteer at this sacred site, I was happy to do anything I could for the main fundraising effort of the year.  The good news is that this year the museum and park raised more money than any year in the past!

There were some unique aspects to this years Pioneer Days.  For the first time there was a Moravian Delaware Indian presence and a Moravian Church presence roaming the grounds.  Also, and perhaps historic, on Sunday morning a Moravian pastor, Darrell Johnson (no relation to Theresa), once more gave a sermon and held a traditional Love Feast at the site of the original chapel, with a Moravian Delaware Indian sitting in the pews.  The singularity of the moment did not escape me.

Other unique aspects were that Theresa Johnson of the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown was also invited to speak to the crowd about her ancestors relationship to the park and the burial mound.  Theresa also donated a native made sweet grass basket that sold for $275.00 at the Pioneer Day Crock Auction.

A particularly special moment for me was a visit to the park on Saturday by Ms. Nancy Hoffman and her daughter who drove from  Pennsylvania to hand deliver a generous donation for the Cross for Gnadenhutten fund.  Nancy introduced herself to me as the 5th great granddaughter of Moravian Missionary Johannes Roth who actually preached in the chapel at Gnadenhutten and was a missionary at the time of the massacre.  She was very happy to hear about the Cross Project and said it is a natural for a monument and is long overdue. 

It was nice to meet Theresa Johnson who is passionate about the burial mound and the park.  We are hoping to convince her and her sister to come to the Remembrance at the Park next March 8, 2019 and sing Amazing Grace in Lenape accompanied by a native flute.  Each year this event grows, and will continue to  grow.

Maybe next year, there will be a Cross for Gnadenhutten casting it's shadow on the burial mound.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#109 Nov-28-2018 06:42:pm

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
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Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

The Cross for Gnadenhutten Rises!

It gives me great pleasure to announce on this site that on Friday, November 16, 2018, the foundation was laid for the Cross for Gnadenhutten.  I began the discussion here over 8 years ago, on this thread, talking about erecting a cross as a monument for the 96 Delaware Christian Indians massacred at the site on March 8, 1782.

Great care was taken by the group that came together that morning to excavate a singular hole 18" square by 48" deep to set a 4 1/2" diameter pole in concrete.  The cross will be mounted on that pole when the concrete is cured.  Due to the proximity of the burial mound, about 30 feet, and being on the site of the original village of Gnadenhutten, the dirt was removed with a trowel, layer by layer by Professor Cole.  The soil was then sifted and bagged for further analysis. No artifact of any kind was observed.

The group was made up of John Heil, curator of the Gnadenhutten Historical Park & Museum, Robert Cook, Professor of Anthropology at the Ohio State University, Emma, a grad student from OSU, Robert Pollina, designer of the cross, Paul Pennock of the Woodworkers of Central Ohio whose group is building the cross, and me, Gerard Heath of the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown.  In addition, Tom Miller from Gnadenhutten provided the pole, the concrete and the mixer and the labor to install all that was needed.  Many thanks go out to this group for their excellent work.

I also would like to thank the many readers of this forum that have donated much of the needed funds for the Cross for Gnadenhutten Project at the Historical Park.  Forgive me if I mention one more time that donations to the project are tax deductible and can be sent to:

The Gnadenhutten Historical Society - Christian Cross Project
c/o John Heil
156 Spring St.
Gnadenhutten, Ohio  44629


So what does this mean?  It means that we were able to get the foundation in the ground before it froze and because we accomplished that, it also means that the Cross for Gnadenhutten will be in place and dedicated on March 8, 2019 when we meet at the burial mound for the annual Remembrance at the Park.

Mark that day and plan to join us.  This year will be historic.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#110 Mar-06-2019 02:26:pm

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 60

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

The Dedication of the Cross for Gnadenhutten is Friday, March 8th 2019 at 9 am

At long last, I write today to invite all who read this post to the Dedication Service at the Cross for Gnadenhutten on Friday morning at 9 am.  Many people will come to the Gnadenhutten Historical Park & Museum that morning to honor and remember the 96 Christian Indians, men women and children, that were massacred by Pennsylvania Militiamen 237 years ago on March 8th 1782.

Chief Denise Stonefish of the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown, Ontario has been invited as well as the Tribal Council but no response as to whether or not they will come.  The Delaware Nation in Bartlesville, Oklahoma have also been notified of the event and an invitation extended to them as well.

In attendance and giving remarks, in addition to myself, are Theresa Johnson from Moraviantown and John Heil, curator of the Gnadenhutten Historical Park and Museum. Actors from the Trumpet in the Land production from nearby Schoenbrunn will do a small reenactment of the removal of the Christian Indians to Captives Town prior to the massacre.  At my request, they will not reenact the massacre as they do in their summertime productions.

In attendance will be the same group from the Ohio History Connection that attended last year and are working to interpret the site from a Moravian Delaware perspective.  Local pastors that will give the benediction and Theresa Johnson is providing a Lenape version of Amazing Grace performed by herself and her friends and relatives.  Should be a  moving experience to hear a Christian hymn sung, in the language of the Lenape, at this site for the first time in 237 years.

This is to be a small informal dedication service to be held outdoors near the cross at the burial mound.  It will be followed up with coffee, hot chocolate and donuts in the museum during a question and answer period for anyone wanting to learn more from the participants.

I will follow up with a post to the forum shortly after the service summarizing all that took place so if you are interested in the event but cannot make it to the park, stop back after March 8th to learn how it went.

All are invited and welcome.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#111 Mar-09-2019 09:24:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4342
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Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

DAY OF REMEMBRANCE HELD AT GNADENHUTTEN

By Mary Krocker / Times-Reporter correspondent

Posted Mar 8, 2019 at 2:01 PM 

https://www.timesreporter.com/news/2019 … adenhutten

[Video and photographs at the link--including one of our member, Newallike (Gerard Heath), who is responsible for initiating this project and continuing to oversee it.]


GNADENHUTTEN Despite Friday morning’s cold temperatures, there was a large attendance at the annual Day of Remembrance service. It was held on the village museum grounds in memory of the 96 Christian Indians buried there.

The Indians were slaughtered on March 8, 1782, by a group of Pennsylvania militiamen. Although the militiamen claimed they were seeking revenge for Indian raids on their frontier settlements, the Indians they murdered had played no role in any attack.

Village Mayor John Heil welcomed those attending, including a group of Delaware Indians from Canada and history students from Indian Valley High. He explained that history was affected by the good relationship of the Delawares at Gnadenhutten and the early white settlers.

A large wooden cross at the site, constructed and erected by members of the Woodworkers of Ohio, also was dedicated. It was noted the cross was constructed of cedar because it is a wood considered special by the Delawares.

Among those attending from Canada were Therese Johnson and her husband Larry of Moraviantown, Ontario. The couple also brought their two great-grandsons, Philip and Kayson Dontator of the Oneida Reserve in Canada, to the event.

Therese became tearful when she spoke about visiting Gnadenhutten, where some of her ancestors are buried, about 20 times over the years. Larry also placed a small burning vessel of tobacco under the cross and the couple sprinkled tobacco at the gravesite, which is an Indian tradition.

Larry also accompanied a musical recording on a small hand-held drum and flute music also was featured. A recording of the hymn, Amazing Grace, was presented in the Lenape language.

Two short scenes from “Trumpet in the Land" were also presented.

Following the service, coffee and donuts were served inside the museum.

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#112 Mar-11-2019 10:33:am

tree hugger
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Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Wonderful photos! Someday I'll get there, thanks for posting that.

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#113 Mar-11-2019 12:09:pm

Newallike
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Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Remarks by Gerard F. Heath at the Cross for Gnadenhutten Dedication Ceremony held March 8th, 2019

As all can see from the article thoughtfully posted by Sschkaak, the event was well attended and thought provoking.  Last Friday, and continuing through to today, I am being asked, "Why a Cross at Gnadenhutten, given the history of the church and the native nations?"

I have been attempting to edit the video shot at the event, with little luck.  I will persist and get it done but I'm afraid the quality is not going to be that good and it will not put our best foot forward.  In the meantime, I will post the narrative of my remarks regarding the erection of a cross and not another native symbol.  Much more was said that day and I will post 3 of 4 separate videos so others can see and hear Larry Johnson drum and sing his song and hear Theresa Johnson's heartfelt remarks at the Burial Mound.

        Good Morning.

        Before I begin, I would like to take a moment to acknowledge and honor the memory of the indigenous nations upon whose land we now stand.   Rheena
        Dennison will help us do this by an offering of tobacco for the Shawnee, for the Lenape, the Odawa, the Miami, and the Wyandot, to name some of them. 
        Thank you Rheena.

        My name is Gerard Heath.  I am a dual citizen of the United States and Canada though I have always lived in the states.  I hold First Nations Status in
        Canada, and my band affiliation is with the Lenape people who are commonly known as the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown in Ontario, Canada. For the
        Lenape from Moraviantown in attendance, my mother is Eva Pauline Martin and my grandmother was Lillian Mae Stonefish.  My ancestor, Christian Moses
        Stonefish dedicated the obelisk you see behind me 90 years after the Gnadenhutten Massacre.

       As I begin my remarks, I want to be clear.  I am a member of the Delaware Nation at Moraviantown, but I do not live on the reserve, and I do not speak for
       them.  The following words and thoughts are my own.

       I want to state at the outset, before we talk about the Cross Project and other modifications being considered for the Park, my position on erecting a cross at
       this burial mound, this holy and sacred place, in spite of the controversial history between the church and native peoples.

       I know full well the history.  I know about the popes in the Catholic Church that issued the Holy Orders, the Papal Bulls, that declared any newly discovered
       lands, by people like Christopher Columbus, to be claimed for the church.  These Papal Bulls, orders to the explorers, came to be known as the Doctrines of
       Discovery.  The Doctrines stated that, any persons found, if not Christians, were to be considered as ‘occupiers’ of the land, not owners of the land. 

       Like a squirrel occupies the land. 
       Like a deer occupies the land. 
       We were clearly classified as ‘less than human’, to be managed.  I know this.

       I know the history of the boarding schools run by the church. I know of the unspeakable abuse to native peoples for such simple things as speaking their own
       language. For this, they would have dry ice applied to their tongues and the flesh ripped from them.  I know this.

       I know all these things, and more, and yet I stand here today to dedicate a cross.  The cross, the most visible sign of the perpetrators of these crimes against
       the native nations.  And so, I have asked myself the same question many others are asking.  Why a cross?  Why not some type of symbol with a native
       connotation?  These are good questions.  I have what I feel is a good answer.  At least it’s the answer that has allowed me, in good conscience, to continue to
       see this project through to the end that you now see. 

       The cross stands in Gnadenhutten.

       And so, let it be known, as we stand here this morning, that this cross does not represent a religious organization of any denomination. 

       This cross stands here as the cross of Jesus Christ, the Son of God, that these 96 Christian natives died believing in.  They saw in the cross, their salvation. 
       The salvation that would be required suddenly, 237 years ago this morning, at the hands of the Pennsylvania Militiamen. 
       These gentle Christian souls spent the night before their murder praying and singing hymns at the foot of that cross. 

       Can there be a more apropos symbol to place at this burial mound where they all are buried together?  In my opinion, it is altogether fitting and proper that
       these Lenape souls await the resurrection they know is coming, at the foot of their beloved cross.

       I want to thank you all for coming out this morning to honor the memory of these Christian Indians.  As you listen to the Lenape version of Amazing Grace
       recorded by Theresa Johnson and her friends and relatives, hold it in your minds, that the last time Christian hymns in Lenape were heard at this place was
       237 years ago, last night.

       My name is Gerard Heath.  These are my words.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#114 Mar-11-2019 01:47:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4342
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Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Njo!  Koolaaptone.  Anushiik!  ["My friend!  You speak good words.  Thank you!"]

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#115 Mar-13-2019 11:45:am

Newallike
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Registered: Apr-23-2010
Posts: 60

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Videos of the Dedication Ceremony of the Cross for Gnadenhutten are on YouTube


For readers of this thread that could not make it to Gnadenhutten on March 8th, 2019 to participate in the Dedication of the Cross for Gnadenhutten, you can go to the YouTube page created to help raise the money for the cross.  There you will find the full 44 minute program, start to finish, and shorter clips of events and speakers. 

I will be continuing to populate the page as I receive and edit photos and videos.  The quality and sound are not the greatest, but we didn't even decide to film it until 5 minutes before we began the program.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqX1hq … P4-cnF1lwg

Click the link above to view the videos.

Thanks to all for your support and assistance.


In essentials, unity
In non-essentials, liberty
In all things, charity

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#116 Mar-13-2019 08:46:pm

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11093

Re: Newcomb: Something missing from PBS's "Tecumseh's Vision"

Thank you!

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