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#1 Jul-26-2018 09:04:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
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Lenape Nation paddles again!

Lenape Nation paddles again, for past and present

Wed, 07/25/2018 - 3:22pm
By
HUNTER HILL

https://riverreporter.com/arts-leisure- … nd-present

The Delaware River has become home to many over the years, but for some, it is tied to the origins of their ancestry. The Lenape Nation has had roots in and around the Delaware River from its headwaters to its mouth since before the advent of European colonists. Known to them as the Lenape Sipu, the Delaware River is an iconic resource that has remained even while other parts of their culture have passed from the records of history.

The Lenape Nation recognizes nature as an enduring force of creation that stands the test of time and outlives us all. In the interest of conserving this resource, they once had a treaty with none other than William Penn, the founding proprietor of what is now Pennsylvania. A letter from Penn to the Lenape dated October 18, 1681, says in part, “Now this great God hath been pleased to make me concerned in your parts of the World, and the king of the Countrey where I live, hath given unto me a great Province therein, but I desire to enjoy it with your Love and Consent, that we may always live together as Neighbours and freinds, else what would the great God say to us, who hath made us not to devoure and destroy one an other but live Soberly and kindly together in the world." [Original spelling and grammar.]

It is thus poetically apt that, in 2002, representatives of the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania met with various neighbors and friends at Pennsbury Manor, the former Morrisville estate of William Penn in Bucks County, PA, to sign a new treaty, a treaty of renewed brotherhood. Various groups and organizations have since signed this treaty with the Lenape as sincere stewards of the river that unites their interests. The document, which has been renewed every four years since 2002, serves as a reminder and a bridge among all who have signed it to serve as caretakers of the Delaware River. This year it will be signed again.

Along with the treaty signing, members and friends of the Lenape Nation embark on a three-week trek down the Delaware River beginning at Hancock, NY and ending all the way downriver in Cape May, NJ, where the river and Delaware Bay empty into the Atlantic. Along the way, they stop and camp as well as stop at certain locations to collect signatures from groups that have pledged their stewardship to the Lenape and the river. Some of these stops include the Zane Grey Museum in Lackawaxen, PA, the Sigal Museum in Easton, PA and at Temple University in Philadelphia. At the conclusion of their journey, they will host a cultural festival where they will celebrate the renewal of the treaty.

This year, the journey is being coordinated by Adam DePaul of the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania Tribal Council. DePaul says this year’s journey is highly anticipated because members of the Lenape Nation who have moved from out of area as far as Ohio have been invited to return and participate. Last time, there were about 30 paddlers, and this year they hope to increase that number further. There will also be a professor of anthropology joining the flotilla for the duration of the journey to video and document everything along the way.

DePaul says that the Lenape have worked to establish new partners, not only to sign the treaty but also to support their culture and how they educate others about their rich history. This year they welcome Temple University and the Pocono Environmental Education Center (PEEC) in Pike county to their list of partners.

But there’s more to the trip than just signing papers or even building relationships. DePaul says, “The mayor of Lower Township is not only joining us for our paddle, but [he] is a musician and will be performing at our finale." That finale is the culmination of the trip, when the paddlers reach West Cape May. It will be a pow-wow-like celebration, DePaul says, at which there will be drummers, speakers, dancing and other entertainment. This year the festivities will include the musical stylings of the Lenape Nation’s own Jim Beer Family Band.

For those unable to join the paddle, there is a cultural center in Easton, PA, with an exhibit of the history and future of the Lenape Nation, including artifacts, crafts and a trading post. The center is located in the Bachmann Publick house at 169 Northampton St.

If you wish to be a part of the river journey, the Lenape Nation will be setting up camp at Fireman’s Field in Hancock, NY on August 3. The following day they will hold an opening ceremony around 9 a.m. before launching and paddling to Equinunk, PA. While there, the Equinunk Historical Society will host tours of their museum and host an environmental program before the paddlers make their way to Long Eddy, where they will camp for the first night of many to come. A full schedule of the journey can be found by contacting Adam DePaul, the Rising Nation coordinator, at 570/817-2188, or emailing him at info@lenape-nation.org. To see more photos and learn more about the Lenape Nation river journey, visit lenape-nation.org. For copies of the William Penn letter and the modern-day treaty, visit www.riverreporter.com.

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#2 Jul-26-2018 02:21:pm

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
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Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

DePaul says that the Lenape have worked to establish new partners, not only to sign the treaty but also to support their culture and how they educate others about their rich history. This year they welcome Temple University and the Pocono Environmental Education Center (PEEC) in Pike county to their list of partners.

Ohh really?! Perhaps Temple needs a little bit of education themselves. roll

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#3 Jul-26-2018 02:30:pm

tree hugger
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Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

Unbelievable! Their Gofundme Account for this:

https://www.gofundme.com/rising-nation-sojourn-expenses

$987 of $3,000 goal

The 2018 Rising Nation River Journey


On August 24, 2002 an historic event took place at the Pennsbury Manor, the former estate of William Penn in Morrisville, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, that marked a new beginning of brotherhood between the Lenape Indian Tribe and the people that neighbor the Delaware River. A treaty of renewed brotherhood was signed by the Lenape and a number of organizations, including environmental groups, churches, historical societies, and sincerely committed individuals, who wish to actively support the Lenape culture and to help sustain their people, language, and way of life. The signing was prefaced by an equally historic and monumental three-week canoe journey, which began at the top of the Delaware River in Hancock, N.Y. and culminated in Cape May, NJ. It was agreed that the re-signing of the Treaty, as well as the River Journey, would take place every four years and did so again in the years of 2006, 2010, and 2014.


It is now 2018 and time to make that wonderful journey, both physically and in Spirit, once again! This year's trip will begin in Hancock, New York on Saturday, August 4th, and will culminate in Cape May, New Jersey with a Lenape finale celebration on Sunday, August 19th.


This page is established to help offset costs incurred by The Lenape Nation of Pa., inc.

We are a non-profit 501c3 organization endeavoring to promote our culture and heritage through education.

Any remaining funds will be used to further education.

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#4 Jul-26-2018 05:35:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4359

Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

I'll contribute as soon as they provide documentary evidence of their Indian ancestry.

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#5 Jul-27-2018 08:05:pm

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11108

Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

sschkaak wrote:

I'll contribute as soon as they provide documentary evidence of their Indian ancestry.

lollol I was considering donating some monopoly money. It's about as legit as they are.

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#6 Aug-03-2018 05:59:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4359

Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

A friendly gesture: Lenape Nation to come ashore in Easton to renew brotherhood treaty

Updated Aug 2, 7:58 AM; Posted Aug 2, 7:57 AM

By Community Bulletin

https://www.lehighvalleylive.com/commun … ation.html

It's a classic case of history repeating itself.

The Lenape Nation will embark on a river journey to yet again refresh its Treaty of Renewed Friendship with the people that live along the Delaware River.

The trip, named the Rising Nation River Journey, will start Saturday, Aug. 4, in at the top of the Delaware River in Hancock, N.Y., and conclude Sunday, Aug. 19, in Cape May. Among the stops along the way, the travelers are scheduled to land at the Sigal Museum in Easton on Sunday, Aug. 12, for a public treaty-signing event.

On Aug. 24, 2002 at the Pennsbury Manor, the former estate of William Penn in Morrisville, the Lenape Nation Indian Tribe of Pennsylvania signed a treaty of renewed brotherhood with a number of organizations, including environmental groups, churches, historical societies, and sincerely committed individuals, who wish actively to support the Lenape and to partner as caretakers of the traditional Lenape homeland and each other.

The signing was prefaced by a three-week canoe journey down the Delaware. It was agreed that the re-signing of the Treaty, as well as the River Journey, should take place every four years. It has since been conducted in 2006, 2010, and 2014.

The Easton stop will be at mile 184 of the river journey. Activities will begin 1 p.m. at Scott Park, with Native American drumming and dancing and period games for children. The sojourners are expected to arrive at 2 p.m.  and the treaty signing is slated to take place at the Sigal Museum at 5 p.m., followed by a potluck supper and the "passing of the wampum" and a presentation by Maya van Rossum of the Delaware Riverkeepers.

The travelers will then depart on Monday, Aug. 13, and head to Upper Black Eddy.

Here is a copy of the 2002 treaty:

Treaty of Renewed Friendship

In the spirit of Chief Tamanend and in the spirit of William Penn, we, the undersigned, do openly recognize the Lenape Indian Tribe as the original inhabitants of Pennsylvania. We acknowledge the Lenape people as the indigenous stewards of their homelands and also as the spiritual keepers of the Lenape Sipu, or Delaware River... And we do hereby commit actively to support our Lenape sisters and brothers in whatever way we are able, for a term of four years, helping to maintain the cultural identity of Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey and Southern New York. We will support the Lenape people in one or more of the following ways: hosting cultural / educational programs, partnering as caretakers

of the Lenape homeland and Delaware River, assisting in Lenape language revival projects, assisting in displays/exhibits of Lenape culture, helping the Lenape people to obtain and/or protect sacred land sites, encouraging updated curriculum in public schools, attending Lenape functions, volunteer service and support, distributing information, and/or financial assistance.

We also recognize that this treaty is good for a term of four years, August 2018 until August 2022, at which time a new treaty may be entered into.

May these partnerships serve to heal the past, give direction for today, and brighten the future as we move forward, learning from the mistakes of some of our forefathers, and may we, together, bring to light the cultural and geographical significance of Pennsylvania, preserving this natural history for all of our children.

May the Creator of all things embrace us as we move ahead.

Nanalakesh

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#7 Aug-23-2018 07:05:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4359

Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

Lenape Nation, Temple community sign treaty to preserve Native American culture

21 August 2018 Maureen Iplenski Around Campus, Features

https://temple-news.com/lenape-nation-t … n-culture/

(Photographs at the link)

When Chuck Gentlemoon was a child, his parents and grandparents taught him to hide who he was. Fearing persecution from those outside of his culture, he concealed his language and beliefs.

“We couldn’t perform our seasonal ceremonies publically," said Gentlemoon, who was elected to be Ceremonial Chief for the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania in 2015. “We couldn’t speak our language publically."

Gentlemoon and his family are descendants of the Lenape Nation, a tribe of Native Americans that originated in the present-day areas of southern New York, eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware.

Over the past few decades, the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania has been reviving their language, history and culture, he added.

The Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania visited Temple University to re-sign the Treaty of Renewed Friendship at the Bell Tower on Aug. 16. According to a Lenape Nation press release, the Treaty of Renewed Friendship states signers of the treaty recognize the Lenape Nation as the original inhabitants of Pennsylvania and spiritual keepers of the Delaware River.

The Lenape tribe presented the treaty to Temple students and faculty members like President Richard Englert.

The treaty details the Lenape Nation’s pledge to preserve their native culture by participating in Lenape language revival projects, land preservation efforts, museum programs and other initiatives.

The event also included a drum circle and a historical reading of letters to the Lenape written by William Penn, founder of the colony of Pennsylvania.

The treaty, which was first signed in 2002, is re-signed every four years. This is the fifth time the Lenape Nation presented the treaty to communities along the Delaware River, and the first time the treaty was re-signed on Main Campus.

Adam DePaul, a teaching assistant in Temple’s English department’s Ph.D. program, organized a treaty signing event at Temple in order to educate younger generations about the culture and language of the Lenape.

The Lenape Nation is building connections with local universities like Temple, the University of Pennsylvania and Swarthmore College, as well as historical societies like the National Audubon Society in hope of saving their culture and language from near extinction.

The Lenape Nation held 12 treaty signing events from Aug. 3-19 during the Rising Nation River Journey, a canoeing journey down the Delaware River from Hancock, New York to Cape May, New Jersey. On each journey, the Lenape forge relationships with those they meet along the way to connect with educational and cultural institutions in the area.

“With each [river] journey, the word spreads more and more," said DePaul, who is also a member of the Lenape Tribal Council. “In 2014, we had well over 70 organizations and hundreds of individuals on our treaty. I can already say that it won’t be too difficult to pass this year."

In this way, Gentlemoon’s generation has worked hard to embrace their Lenape culture.

“My grandfather grew up believing that it was bad to be Indian," said Gentlemoon, 58.

Gentlemoon’s grandfather was taken from his family by European colonizers and enrolled in the Carlisle Indian School, the first federally-funded boarding school in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, when he was a child.

The mission of the school’s founder Captain Richard Henry Pratt was to assimilate students to the Anglo-Saxon culture of the United States in the late 1800s to early 1900s. Native American students were required to wear uniforms and speak English, instead of wearing their Native clothing and using their Native language.
Through these practices, a number of Native Americans were distanced from their culture for many years.

“We wanted to reawaken the knowledge in people that there are still Lenape in Pennsylvania," DePaul said.

Anthropology professor Paul Garrett and 2014 anthropology alumnus Matt Reigle are collaborating with the Lenape Nation to create a documentary about the tribe’s culture and river journey to bring attention to the Lenape people. 

“The documentary focuses on the Lenape’s historical relationship to the river, along with their current and ongoing efforts to revitalize their culture and language," Garrett said. “It’s been an interesting and emotionally gripping experience viewing the formation of relationships between the Lenape, residents, and organizations."

Initiatives like the Rising Nation River Journey and treaty signings allow the Lenape to remember their origins and educate local communities about the indigenous tribe.

“When I was a young boy, my grandmother used to say, ‘Remember who you are. Remember that you’re Lenape,’" Gentlemoon said. “We’re in that time where that if we don’t do something about our recognition… our grandchildren and their grandchildren won’t have anything to hold onto because it’ll all just be washed away."

CORRECTION: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated Gentlemoon and his family are descendants of the Nanticoke-Lenni Lenape Nation. They are descendants of the Lenape Nation.

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#8 Aug-23-2018 07:07:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4359

Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

I found this statement interesting:  "Gentlemoon’s grandfather was taken from his family by European colonizers and enrolled in the Carlisle Indian School, the first federally-funded boarding school in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, when he was a child."

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#9 Aug-24-2018 07:50:am

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
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Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

sschkaak wrote:

I found this statement interesting:  "Gentlemoon’s grandfather was taken from his family by European colonizers and enrolled in the Carlisle Indian School, the first federally-funded boarding school in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, when he was a child."

I was just ready to quote that myself. This is the first time I recall hearing this claim. This is a statement that can be easily verified one way or another.

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#10 Aug-26-2018 04:40:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4359

Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

No person surnamed Demund (Chuck Gentlemoon's surname) shows up in the student records of Carlisle Indian School, which are online, here:  http://carlisleindian.dickinson.edu/student-files .  Checked various spellings: Demund, Demond, Demont, Dement, Demand, etc.  Also checked all Delaware Indian students.  None with that surname or anything like that surname, and none from New Jersey or Pennsylvania. 

Perhaps, the reporter misunderstood what she was told.

Last edited by sschkaak (Aug-26-2018 05:25:am)

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#11 Aug-26-2018 09:17:am

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11108

Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

Thanks for that, sschkaak.  That's disappointing as I was hoping even one claim they made would be true.

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#12 Aug-26-2018 03:09:pm

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11108

Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

Perhaps, the reporter misunderstood what she was told.

I thought that might be the case as well. I've corresponded with the reporter and below is an exact quote from her:

Gentlemoon's exact quote was, "When my grandfather was a little child, he was taken away from his family and sent to Carlisle Indian School."

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#13 Aug-26-2018 05:40:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4359

Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

Well...  His maternal grandfather isn't listed among the Carlisle students, either.  This is a real puzzler.  neutral

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#14 Aug-26-2018 06:02:pm

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11108

Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

I don't think it's a puzzle at all. It's quite clear now this is a blatant untruth. This isn't a distant family story that loses credibility over the years.

neutral

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#15 Oct-13-2018 11:05:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4359

Re: Lenape Nation paddles again!

Historical Society Hosts Meeting

http://www.poconorecord.com/entertainme … choolhouse

The Eldred Historical Society has accepted an invitation to hold its regular October meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the 1855 One-Room Schoolhouse, 485 Church Road, Kunkletown. The meeting and a tour of the school are open to the public free. No donations will be accepted.

The school will open at 6 p.m. Tuesday, and the brief business meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. The school will remain open until 8 p.m. On display, at the meeting, will be copy of the recently discovered marriage license of the former postmaster of the Kunkletown Post Office James F. Pearsol and his wife, Sophia Borger. Pearsol was known for bringing telephone service to the West End.

The primary focus of the historical society is the preservation of the old post office that was built in 1864.

The schoolhouse has three new exhibits: “Hex Signs of the Pennsylvania Dutch," “The Runaway Textile Mills of the Poconos" and “The Lenape Nation: Protecting the Delaware River."

All people attending the event will receive a free copy of the Eldred Township Passport, which features a map of the township identifying the locations of 23 sites of historical or cultural importance.

On Oct. 21, the open house of the schoolhouse will begin at 1 p.m. and continue until 3 p.m., and be co-hosted by the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania. Guests will be given an opportunity to sign the 2018 Treaty of Friendship. Last summer, members of the Lenape Nation paddled along the Delaware River and stopped along the route for special events and the once every four year treaty signing.

For information, call 917-582-7010.

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