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#126 Aug-23-2015 11:40:pm

Suckachsinheet
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Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 947

Re: "United Eastern Lenape Nation"

I wish I had the time and money to go see this. It could be quite interesting. When did the Lenape live in England...?


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#127 Aug-24-2015 11:14:am

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 10925

Re: "United Eastern Lenape Nation"

Maybe it's just me but this is kind of creepy. My first thought was Jonestown. neutral

sschkaak wrote:

http://www.starbeacon.com/news/local_news/lenape-nation-hosting-event-next-weekend/article_ce719424-9f34-580a-8d5b-463e479e84d7.html

With funds gathered from each year’s powwow, the nation seeks to build a new village “off-the-grid.”

“Our people will live in it like our ancestors did — no electricity, no nothing. We live off the land,” Red Wolf said. “We’re going to invite people to come and stay with us and do the same thing.

“We will teach them our old ways and to learn how to survive. ... It’s always been our nation’s goal to do this.”

The nation’s former chief, Billy Blue Feather, hoped to see that village founded in his lifetime — however, he died last month, Red Wolf said. There have been offers in Pennsylvania, but Red Wolf said Ashtabula County is her tribe’s “home base.”

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#128 Aug-24-2015 06:08:pm

Suckachsinheet
Member
Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 947

Re: "United Eastern Lenape Nation"

Billy and Pam were selling this idea back in '98-'99, when I was leading the Lightning Valley Village. At the time it was a Y2K thing. They had a survivalist store at the time. But even then it was a little creepy. It carried a real "us and them" flavor...


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#129 Jun-16-2016 06:16:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4011
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Re: "United Eastern Lenape Nation"

Native American 'teachers' share culture this weekend

By JUSTIN DENNIS jdennis@starbeacon.com

http://www.starbeacon.com/news/local_ne … 56289.html

Submitted photo:

Powwow head male dancer, David Strader, an Edgewood High School graduate, shows off his dance regalia during a performance at an annual Inter-tribal Powwow, presented by the United Eastern Lenape Nation.

WILLIAMSFIELD TOWNSHIP — A pounding drum circle will guide those with Native American blood back to their roots, and call to any and all who want to immerse themselves in the culture, this weekend at the Ashtabula County Antique Engine Club, along U.S. Route 322.

The United Eastern Lenape Nation is set to open the gates to its 12th Annual “Honoring Our Ancestors” Powwow at noon Friday, with several tribal dance and drum performances, food, between 15 and 20 handmade craft vendors, and auction and more to follow.

The Lenape — of whom between 100 to 150 live in Ashtabula County — are known as “the grandfathers” or “the teachers,” tasked with passing on the tribe’s way of life to others. Bonnie “Morning Dove” Thompson said she expects the event will draw tribes from as far as Wisconsin or North Carolina, along with the tri-state area.

“People will say

we didn’t even know there was any native people around here ... it’s because of the fact that we’re not a nationally recognized tribe,” she said. “Ohio says there’s no Indians — there’s Indians in Ohio.”

The tribe’s nonprofit “Lenape Path” mission statement calls for collaboration with other nonprofits and educators in the community to enhance the understanding of Native American culture, developing programs or presentations — like the annual powwows — to teach others.

“We welcome the community to come in and join us and ask questions. We do what we can to answer the questions,” Morning Dove said.

Each day begins with a “grand entry” ceremony, featuring a color guard, dancers and other tribal dignitaries alongside Lenape Chief Bob “Quiet Wolf” Thompson, who carries the tribe’s sacred staff into a blessed dance circle, opening the day’s festivities.

Vendors’ booths are open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day, with a wide array of handmade jewelry, woodwork, paintings, sculptures and more. Visitors can also nosh on traditional Native American fare, like unleavened “fry bread.” On Saturday and Sunday evenings, the powwow auction opens up.

Several Native American performers are on this year’s schedule from noon to 6 p.m., including host drum group Rapid River Drum of Ashtabula, with guests Medicine Thunder Drum — which is preparing for a more prominent showing this year — and Clearwater Drum, nominated for new folk music they’ve been practicing, which they’ll play in the afternoons.

The powwow is also expected to feature between 30 and 50 dancers, Morning Dove said.

“It’s OK for individuals, whether they’re native or not, to come in and dance in the circle, as long as they’re dressed modestly,” Morning Dove said.

The tribe hosts a veterans’ dance each day, and a special charity moonlight dance from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday. Proceeds from the moonlight dance benefit the local Seventh Generation Land Fund.

For years, the Lenape have planned to create a self-sufficient settlement — the “River of Many Fish Village” — on which anyone can learn to live off the land. The traditional Native American longhouse village would subsist on bow-hunting, hand-fishing and gardening — no electricity or modern comforts.

“We want the village to show how it can be done without all the conveniences,” Quiet Wolf told the Star Beacon last year. “We’d come back to where we don’t have the television, we don’t have the communication of modern technology. We have the idea of when we sit down, we talk face-to-face.

Traditional Native American powwows, like this weekend’s annual event, are a chance for distant tribes to come together and discuss the year’s happenings, or share knowledge. Each Lenape powwow often brings in hundreds of visiting Native Americans, some from as far as Canada.

“It’s an opportunity for people who have native blood, for people who don’t get to be around their native culture, because they’ve moved,” Morning Dove said.

Admission is $5

for adults; $3 for

seniors 55 years and older and children ages 6 to 12; and free for children 5 years and younger, according to the event’s Facebook page.

Last edited by sschkaak (Jun-16-2016 06:23:am)

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#130 Jun-16-2016 12:12:pm

Suckachsinheet
Member
Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 947

Re: "United Eastern Lenape Nation"

I wish I had the time and resources to visit. I'm sure it would be educational...


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#131 Sep-29-2017 11:32:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4011
Website

Re: "United Eastern Lenape Nation"

http://www.alliednews.com/news/pow-wow- … 0d3f3.html

Pow Wow this weekend
By MONICA PRYTS Allied News Staff Writer Sep 28, 2017

Photos at link

The public is invited to the Pow Wow, which will feature dancing, drumming, vendors, auctions, and more. This photo shows a couple's dance; in front are Family Star and the late Aggressive Eagle, and at the end of the line are Sharen Wilson and her partner Jerry Brown, also known as Medicine of the Rose and Spirit of the Hawk.

From left, Chief Quiet Wolf, chief of the United Eastern Lenape Nation and Morning Dove, the mother of UELN, are pictured during the group's Native American Intertribal Pow Wow at Munnell Run Farm. This year's event is set for Friday through Sunday at the Mercer County Grange Fairgrounds in Findley Township.  CONTRIBUTED TO ALLIED NEWS

Local members of the United Eastern Lenape Nation are hosting their annual Native American Intertribal Pow Wow this weekend in Findley Township.
"We've grown every year," said Sharen Wilson, also known as Medicine of the Rose.

The event, organized by the Family Circle, will be held Friday through Sunday at the Mercer County Grange Fairgrounds on state Route 58, just outside of Mercer. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and the public is welcome to attend.

The Pow Wow was held at Munnell Run Farm in Coolspring Township the last two years, and there has been more interest from Lenape Nation members and area residents; a larger space was needed this year.

The Family Circle chapter of the UELN meets in Greenville, and the UELN is located in Ashtabula, Ohio. Since the event is intertribal, every nation is invited as well as those with no connection to the Native Americans, said Wilson, who lives in New Wilmington.

"We're a teaching nation," she said, encouraging attendees to ask questions.

Visitors will learn about the Lenape Nation and their work to honor and give back to Mother Earth. For example, if you take a tree, plant another tree in return, Wilson said.

There will be 23 vendors; some will be selling Native American items like jewelry, rugs, leather, stones and clothes. Food vendors include Sweat Jeanie's, Grove City.

Daily demonstrations will feature a glassblower and flint knapping. There will be dancing and drumming from noon to 6 p.m., and all dancers and drummers are welcome to join.

A "grand entry" opening ceremony will be held at noon each day. Saturday's ceremony will include the Jamestown VFW Honor Guard, and veterans, firefighters, police officers and other EMS personnel will be recognized for their service.

A Native American auction will be held at 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, and there will be a Chinese auction for baskets, and a raffle for a Native American woman's shawl.

Admission is $5 for adults; $3 for kids and seniors; and free for veterans. A weekend pass for all three days is $12.

Info: Call Sharen Wilson at 724-718-3977

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#132 Oct-08-2017 03:13:pm

Suckachsinheet
Member
Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 947

Re: "United Eastern Lenape Nation"

All sanctioned under the Native Arts and Crafts laws, of course...


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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