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#51 Jan-30-2011 06:54:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

Memexsitat wrote:

"I'm thinking it's possibly Manito with some sort of suffix, but I also don't know much of anything about the language yet, really. Are there any suffixes such as 'me', 'may', or 'ma' that might create such a disambiguation?"

I can't think of any that would make sense of this name.  One problem is that the word, manitto ('spirit-being'), cannot take a suffix beginning with a consonant without adding a -w + vowel- preceding it.  For example, to add the locative suffix, -nk, the word would look like this:  manittowunk ('in a spirit-being').  To add the 3rd person conjunct suffix, -t, it would look like this:  eli manittowit ('because he-is-a-spirit').  So, you have this extra syllable to take into account.

Last edited by sschkaak (Jan-30-2011 11:17:pm)

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#52 Jan-31-2011 05:25:am

Memexsitat
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From: Binghamton, NY
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

Hm, I see, thank you very much.
I believe this is still consistent or at least possible in the word Manitome. If, for instance, the traditional spelling was Manittowme or something to that effect, or even with the consonant 'n' I can imagine it being disambiguated to its current spelling.
It is also entirely possible that this is another language as well, though it is clear to me that it is a native word of some kind. This area experienced a conglomeration of a great many people.


"In our story of Creation, we talk about each one of us having our own path to travel, and our own gift to give and to share. You see, what we say is that the Creator gave us all special gifts; each one of us is special. And each one of us is a special gift to each other because we've got something to share."
-Slow Turtle, Wampanoag

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#53 Jan-31-2011 07:06:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

I suppose a Northern Unami word, *manittowameu, could be imagined.  This would mean, "it is a spirit row" or "it is a spirit line," etc.  The -u = a voiceless w, which is a barely audible whispered breath, that isn't even pronounced in the southern dialect.  I guess -towameu (i.e., toe-wah-may-w) could sound like -tome (i.e, toe-may), when said quickly or indistinctly.

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#54 Mar-07-2011 01:35:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

18. pephonigetonk,  tooth extractor tool   yikes

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/toothkey.jpg

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#55 Mar-07-2011 03:31:pm

tree hugger
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

sschkaak wrote:

18. pephonigetonk,  tooth extractor tool   yikes

http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128 … othkey.jpg

Ahhhhhhhh yikes

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#56 Mar-07-2011 04:08:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/Dentalkeyusage.jpg

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#57 Mar-07-2011 08:38:pm

Pepaxkang
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Registered: Nov-25-2008
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

Those pictures make me cringe. Now I want some prickly ash bark.... smile

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#58 Oct-29-2011 03:40:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

sschkaak wrote:

3. achgutschgan,  "when the trees and bushes are laden with snow"

Like today (Oct. 29, 2011), in northern New Jersey:

/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/71.jpg

Last edited by sschkaak (Oct-29-2011 03:41:pm)

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#59 Jul-22-2013 09:57:am

sschkaak
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

19. meteewihhilleu    "loon"  The name means "the bird with spiritual power" or "shaman bird."  Scroll down and play "Typical Voice," on the left side of this URL, http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_Loon/id , to hear, perhaps, why.   cool

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#60 Jul-22-2013 05:06:pm

tree hugger
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

Cool!! big_smile

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#61 Jun-19-2014 10:37:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

20. If you want to ask, "What kind of a tree is that?", in Lenape, you say, "Auwen mhittuk?"  Literally, "Who is the tree?", because a tree is an animate noun.

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#62 Jun-20-2014 04:27:am

tree hugger
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

sschkaak wrote:

If you want to ask, "What kind of a tree is that?", in Lenape, you say, "Auwen mhittuk?"  Literally, "Who is the tree?", because a tree is an animate noun.

Interesting. smile

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#63 Jun-22-2014 01:48:pm

Papelanek
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Registered: Feb-04-2012
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

Cool! I'm going to start doing that in English.

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#64 Jun-22-2014 02:34:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

You can also say, "Who's the spoon?" and "Who's the kettle?" and Who's the potato? etc.   smile

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#65 Jun-22-2014 02:51:pm

tree hugger
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

sschkaak wrote:

You can also say, "Who's the spoon?" and "Who's the kettle?" and Who's the potato? etc.   smile

I love this, I'm going to start doing this too.

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#66 Dec-26-2014 12:55:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

21.  ktakima - "you talk about him (or her) so strongly that you pull him (or her) out of the dirt." This is said to somebody who is talking about a dead person and starts shaking, etc., from the dead person's spirit being too close.

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#67 Jun-05-2017 05:56:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Unique Lenape words and phrases

22. metellen palippawe - "ten dollars."     The word, palippawe, means "buck," as in "a male deer."  Buckskins were an early trade item which were actually called "bucks" in deeds.  Later, when cash was exchanged for goods, a dollar equaled one buckskin, or "buck."  This is how it entered the English AND Lenape languages, as an alternate name for "dollar."  (Note:  Only the singular form is used when applying the word to dollars.  This rule holds true for most units of measure in Lenape.)

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