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#1 Aug-01-2016 09:05:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4270
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MDIN Storyteller in Ohio

http://www.news-herald.com/20160731/two … n-kirtland

Two tribal story-tellers share rich American history not often found in books at East Shore Unitarian Universalist Church in Kirtland

Picture caption:

Munsee Lenape Tribe member Cedar Heart, foreground, explains his attitude about derogatory symbolism relative to Native Americans in popular culture during a Q & A session July 30 at East Shore Unitarian Universalist Church in Kirtland. Fellow native storyteller and Seneca Indian Tribe member Blue Wolf Woman looks on in the background.

By Jonathan Tressler, The News-Herald

Posted: 07/31/16, 12:02 AM EDT | Updated: 1 day ago

Never mind the latest, big-budget Hollywood blockbusters.

For about five hours on July 30 inside the sanctuary at East Shore Unitarian Universalist Church in Kirtland, a few dozen lucky listeners likely became bedazzled by the likes of the Vampire Skeleton, How the Rabbit Lost His Tail and other riveting narratives, thanks to Native American story-tellers Blue Wolf Woman and Cedar Heart.

The pair was at the church thanks to the efforts of Northeast Ohio Lenape (also known as Delaware) Indian historians and Lenape Native Path, an Ashtabula County organization.

These kinds of Indian tales chronicle life, the natural world and lots of simple things we likely don’t think much about in these modern times.

According to Las Vegas, New Mexico resident and member of the Corn Planter Band of the Wolf Clan of the Seneca Tribe, Blue Wolf Woman, known also by her English name, Nancy Upthegrove-Jaramillo, they are not only entertainment. They also seek to teach and carry on her people’s history, tradition and life lessons.

“The stories are there for a reference, for protection and they’re told on four different levels,” Upthegrove-Jaramillo said following the engagement. “No. 1: They’re for the children to enjoy. No. 2: They’re for adolescents: ‘This is the moral of the story.’ No. 3: they’re for adults — parents — to keep telling the stories for protection, to keep things right. And, No. 4, for the elders and for their spirituality.”

In other words, she said, the stories native people tell teach lessons, entertain and keep their cultures alive and well as time moves on.

Cedar Heart of the Munsee Lenape Tribe, who lives in Cardington in Morrow County and is also known by his English name, Robert Patrick Nichols, traveling and telling native stories is all part of keeping it real and maintaining what’s important in our lives, whether we’re American, European, African, Asian or alien.

“We need to tell the stories so the stories aren’t forgotten. People don’t often realize that we exist as native, or Indian, people,” he said. “So, by coming out to a venue that allows us to be public about it, we expand the awareness of our existence. And, the stories, that’s the important thing.”

He added that they provide a “good excuse to get together” with his people and that’s more important these days than ever.

“When they’re 35, 40, 45 years old, our children, our children’s children, will remember who they are through these stories and they’ll come home to their people,” he said, adding that “so often today, you go to school. You graduate college. You chase that almighty dollar and then you find out that what’s important is what you left behind. And then you come home to your people.”

Upthegrove-Jaramillo, now 64, said she grew up in western New York among the Seneca living in Tuscarora and Victor and, when she moved West, found a home among Indians in that part of the country, who shared so many beliefs, customs and, of course, stories, with her.

As a teacher there, she’s been able to help perpetuate native culture in many ways, even producing a short YouTube video called The Lizard People of Chaco Canyon.

Both storytellers said anyone interested in learning, being entertained and expanding their understanding of the world and different cultures, especially ones that developed right in their own back yards, should look into attending a native story-telling engagement or even a Native American Powwow like the 8th Annual Healing Mother Earth event scheduled for Aug. 5, 6 and 7 in Jefferson.

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#2 Aug-01-2016 09:10:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4270
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Re: MDIN Storyteller in Ohio

And, how do we know he's MDIN:  http://lenapedelawarepassportoffice.com/contact

I have no idea who the woman is.

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#3 Aug-01-2016 09:35:am

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11031

Re: MDIN Storyteller in Ohio

The pair was at the church thanks to the efforts of Northeast Ohio Lenape (also known as Delaware) Indian historians and Lenape Native Path, an Ashtabula County organization.

Clickable link in this article takes you to: https://www.facebook.com/pages/United-E … 2276679244

United Eastern Lenape Nation & Lenape Native Path
Organization

http://www.ueln.com

And, how do we know he's MDIN:  http://lenapedelawarepassportoffice.com/contact

Of course leads to the infamous Little Soldier. Seriously, lenape delaware passport office?????


Looks like those groups are working together again...

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#4 Aug-01-2016 09:59:am

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4270
Website

Re: MDIN Storyteller in Ohio

How'd you like to try getting through customs with one of those passports?   tongue

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#5 Aug-01-2016 10:00:am

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11031

Re: MDIN Storyteller in Ohio

lol He's come a long way from when he made his own license plates.

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#6 Aug-01-2016 10:02:am

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4270
Website

Re: MDIN Storyteller in Ohio

lol  cool

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#7 Aug-01-2016 10:08:am

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4270
Website

Re: MDIN Storyteller in Ohio

That UELN link doesn't work, anymore.

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#8 Aug-01-2016 11:20:am

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11031

Re: MDIN Storyteller in Ohio

sschkaak wrote:

That UELN link doesn't work, anymore.

Indeed it doesn't. That was a direct quote from the facebook page, it also has the url repeated. Very strange.

Looking further, following the number provided on the page for Lenape Native Path:

http://www.manta.com/c/mb430dr/lenape-native-path

Lenape Native Path
William N Harford
5145 Cortland Avenue
Ashtabula, OH 44004 - View Map
Phone: (440) 992-7397
Web: www.ueln.com

Bob Thompson
President

UELN  "alternate??" website. Phone number matching, definitely backed by the UELN: http://www.uelnation.org/#!events/c9em

Not much info on that site either.

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#9 Aug-04-2016 10:33:pm

Suckachsinheet
Member
Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 966

Re: MDIN Storyteller in Ohio

I thought Blue Feather walked on last year. I'd say the info is out of date.


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#10 Aug-04-2016 10:35:pm

Suckachsinheet
Member
Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 966

Re: MDIN Storyteller in Ohio

But I had been unaware that Cedar Heart was drinking the MDIN Kool-Aid...


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#11 Aug-05-2016 01:25:pm

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11031

Re: MDIN Storyteller in Ohio

Sach has passed on as well.

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