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#1 Sep-17-2015 03:34:pm

sschkaak
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Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

Susan Taffe Reed Named Director of the Native American Program

http://now.dartmouth.edu/2015/09/susan-taffe-reed-named-director-native-american-program

September 11, 2015 by Hannah Silverstein, MALS '09

Susan Taffe Reed, an ethnomusicologist and the president of the Eastern Delaware Nations, has been named director of Dartmouth’s Native American Program (NAP). She began work Sept. 1.


“I look forward to contributing to an environment in which Dartmouth’s Native students continue to thrive,” says Susan Taffe Reed. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00)

As director, Taffe Reed—who recently completed postdoctoral work at Bowdoin College in Maine—is responsible for mentoring and advising students, creating a collaborative environment in which the whole Dartmouth community can engage, and advocating for the needs of Native students and their organizations throughout campus.

Describing herself as a “bridge builder,” Taffe Reed says, “I am interested in looking at the ways in which Dartmouth’s Native American students’ experiences—their residential living, activities, coursework, and support systems—enhance their learning. I look forward to contributing to an environment in which Dartmouth’s Native students continue to thrive.”

She serves as a program adviser for the residential Native American House, assists with first-year student orientation programs, works with faculty and students to create co-curricular opportunities, and helps coordinate the annual student-run Dartmouth Powwow, among other duties.

“Susan brings a strong academic background, deep experience supporting Native students at other leading institutions, including Cornell and Bowdoin, and a wealth of cultural-programming experience from both higher education and leadership roles in her Delaware tribal community,” says Vice Provost for Student Affairs Inge-Lise Ameer, co-chair of the search committee. “She is a wonderful fit for Dartmouth.”

Taffe Reed earned her PhD in musicology and American Indian studies at Cornell in 2011, and has completed postdoctoral work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as well as at Bowdoin. The author of several journal and encyclopedia articles, her first book, Gathering Resilience: Powwow Music and Dance in the Mountains of Pennsylvania, is under advanced contract from Ohio University Press.

NAP’s history at Dartmouth goes back to the 1970s, when President John Kemeny rededicated the College to its founding mission of educating Native students. Dartmouth has graduated more Native American students, from more tribes, than all other Ivy League institutions combined.

To further this mission, NAP partners with both the College and tribal communities nationally to serve the educational needs of Native students—and to prepare them to serve the needs of their communities.

In what Samson Occom Professor N. Bruce Duthu ’80 calls “a positive and significant restructuring,” the director of NAP will, for the first time, report to the vice provost for student affairs and serve as a member of the vice provost’s senior leadership team.

“In elevating the position to this senior level and adding dedicated staff to support the director, the College ensures that Dartmouth will continue to play the leading role in attracting, educating, and graduating the most talented and tribally diverse group of Native students in the country,” says Duthu, a professor of Native American Studies who also served on the search committee.

“I’m excited for what lies ahead for Susan, for the Native American Program, and most especially, for Dartmouth’s Native students. I look forward to working with her as a partner and colleague.”

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#2 Sep-17-2015 05:20:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

Many interesting comments at the end of this article (at the link):


Indian Enough for Dartmouth?

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/201 … -198146549


September 17, 2015

By

Scott Jaschik


Dartmouth College this month appointed Susan Taffe Reed as director of its Native American Program. In a news release, the college noted Taffe Reed's academic background (a Cornell University Ph.D. and postdocs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Bowdoin College), her research interest (ethnomusicology) and something else: Taffe Reed, Dartmouth noted, is president of Eastern Delaware Nations Inc.

If Dartmouth expected applause for hiring someone with a strong academic background and a personal background that would appeal to its Native American students, whom the program serves, it was mistaken.

Not all Native Americans recognize Eastern Delaware Nations as an Indian tribe. Nor do federal or state governments. So leading the group wasn't seen as a plus, but as a minus. And then a blog ran a detailed genealogical post about Taffe Reed's grandparents (from whom she draws a Native American connection) alleging, with legal documents, that they are white European immigrants and their descendants. Dartmouth and Taffe Reed dispute the blog post, but did not issue a detailed rebuttal.

From there it went to social media, with people writing on the Facebook page of Dartmouth's Native American Alumni Association that the college was insulting Native Americans, not supporting them. One post said: "Congratulations Dartmouth on hiring your very own Rachel Dolezal as the director of the Native American Program. Susan Taffe Reed is not a member of a federally recognized tribe nor does she have legitimate Native American ancestry."

The reference to Rachel Dolezal -- who was head of the Spokane, Wash., NAACP and an adjunct instructor of Africana studies at Eastern Washington University when it was revealed over the summer that she is white, despite her claims to the contrary -- is significant, even if Taffe Reed and Dartmouth officials say that she hasn't distorted her background and that the comparison is unfair.

Nonetheless, criticism of her appointment comes at a time of scrutiny of people who have claimed a racial or ethnic status that not everyone feels is accurate. There was the case of Andrea Smith, associate professor of media and cultural studies at the University of California at Riverside, who shortly after the Dolezal scandal broke was accused of faking a Cherokee heritage that many say she lacks. And there is the recent case of a white man who published poetry with a Chinese name.

Adding to the scrutiny for Taffe Reed is Dartmouth's history. The college was founded to educate Native Americans. While the 18th-century definition of educating Native Americans would not win support today, and didn't last as a focus of Dartmouth, the college since the 1970s has embraced that mission again, boasting of educating more Native American students than other Ivies or elite colleges.

A key difference between the Dolezal and Smith cases and that of Taffe Reed, Dartmouth says, is that she was forthright about an identity of mixed Native American and European heritage.

A statement from the college notes awareness that some Native Americans do not consider the Eastern Delaware Nations to be a tribe, but the college characterizes this as a dispute among different groups and not one for Dartmouth to judge.

"Susan Taffe Reed never represented herself as a member of a federally recognized tribe," the college's statement says. "It is illegal to hire or deny employment based on an individual's ethnicity; Susan was offered the position based on her skills and experience. The search committee was comprised of members of the community she will serve and they are fully confident in her abilities. While we recognize the legitimacy of the concern that individuals may falsely identify themselves as Native American, Dartmouth also understands that there are varying perspectives in the Native American community over what constitutes ethnicity, which is a separate issue from false claims of ethnicity. It is not up to Dartmouth to determine which perspective is correct."

That statement, however, has not satisfied some Native American scholars and activists, who have been circulating the blog post about Taffe Reed's background and speaking out against the college's decision. Generally, these Native Americans say they see roles for many different kinds of people -- including people without any Native American heritage -- in doing scholarship on American Indians and helping American Indian students.

Their anger is largely about the Eastern Delaware Nations. That group's website states clearly that it is not a recognized tribe, but says that its members come from 12 tribes that were present in Pennsylvania. The website also states that some of its members "are not of American Indian descent, but join as social members in support of a family member or to assist EDN in educational outreach and other activities."

Michelle Leonard, who is an active member of the Shinnecock Indian Nation, said that Native Americans have lost much of their history to "cultural thieves," who "appropriate" parts of Native American history and culture without truly being part of the communities they claim to embrace. "It's embarrassing and upsetting" that Dartmouth doesn't see the conflict over the group Taffe Reed leads, Leonard said.

The frustration is particularly strong for some members of the Delaware Tribe, which is a federally recognized tribe. Some Delaware leaders believe Eastern Delaware implies some level of connection to the Delaware. Nicky Michael, a member of the Delaware Tribal Council and a visiting professor of Native American history at the University of Wyoming, said that the Delaware Tribe members ended up in Oklahoma after six forced relocations by the United States government, and that history means something to members.

Michael said she would not have objected had Dartmouth selected a white person to lead the Native American Program. "I could swallow it if she was a non-Indian and got her job in her own right. I know a lot of academics who are [white] and involved with Native Americans, and they do fine. But to pretend to be something you aren't is different." She said that the Eastern Delaware group led by Taffe Reed "is using our culture and our name and she is using it to gain access to a position like that."

"I know what students have fought for" in programs for Native Americans, "and they have fought for the inclusion of real Native peoples," she said.
Because Dartmouth has, she said, supported Native American scholarship and Native American students, "this is a real stab at my heart."

Taffe Reed declined to participate in a direct interview, but agreed to answer a few questions via email. She did not respond to a question asking about her background and the claims made on the blog about her, but she indicated that some of the information on the website was not accurate, without providing details.
Issues of identity are important to her, Taffe Reed said. "My ties to all aspects of my identity are very important to me. Throughout this process, I have been forthright about my personal and professional experience. Given the history of this continent, it is not uncommon for Native identities to be mixed and complex.

The Native and campus community at Dartmouth is inclusive of all backgrounds and experiences. It is important to me that all of our students feel welcome, engaged and supported no matter where they come from. My job is to provide academic, cultural and personal support to all Native students. When I teach in the classroom, the best learning experience comes from the variety of experiences and perspectives represented. Native students coming from different backgrounds learn from one another’s experience in ways that enrich their own."

As to the questions raised about the Eastern Delaware Nations, Taffe Reed said that not only was she a member of that group, but that her research was based there. "My most recent academic scholarship is about powwow music and dance, and the experience of Native peoples in the mountains of Pennsylvania. It is a diverse group of people with a rich oral history and body of experience to share. I look forward to sharing my work and my experience with the Dartmouth community. It is simply inaccurate to say that there are no people of Native American descent in Pennsylvania."

Asked for her reaction to the online critiques of her hire, Taffe Reed said: "I am concerned about ways in which questions of identity and authenticity affect [students]. Sadly, it is a teachable moment that enables our students to reflect on the complex history and issues of identity in Indian country. I want all of our Native students to feel equally valued and welcome."

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#3 Sep-18-2015 07:31:am

tree hugger
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

A few comments that I found interesting:

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/201 … -198146549

David Chamberlain  TinkerTailor1620 • 10 hours ago
Oh but you are quite wrong, she is Native American.
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TinkerTailor1620  David Chamberlain • 8 hours ago
Not by definition of the Secretary of the Interior. The EDN is not on the list of federally acknowledged tribes published in the federal register, so she is not an American Indian. Here is how the Secretary of the Interior defines "Native American:"

"The term 'Native American' came into broad usage in the 1970's as an" [politically correct] "alternative to 'American Indian.' Since that time, however, it has been gradually expanded within the public lexicon to include all Native peoples of the United States and its trust territories, i.e., American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, Chamorros, and American Samoans, as well as persons from Canada First Nations and indigenous communities in Mexico and Central and South America who are U.S. residents."

By that definition, she is not a "Native American," either.
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David Chamberlain  TinkerTailor1620 • 38 minutes ago
I've known Susan since she was a child. I know her father, and have many friends in EDN. Like myself, she is Native American. Our ancestors never went onto Reservations, but always retained pride in their ancestry and this has come down through the generations. We exist, have existed, will continue to exist, definitions be damned. We know who we are. I am of the Big Horn Lenape Nation, and I grew up Native American, this is the identity I grew up with. We stand together with Susan in a Circle, the Critics and their Pompous Ignorance believe what you will.

Jimmy Boy Dial • a day ago
Approximately 17 years ago as I was moving from New Jersey to Virginia I was being defended by the ACLU in a Federal suit in Pennsylvania by the EDN for writing in my newsletter that the EDN was not a legitimate tribe and had members that could not prove any Indian heritage at all. The case was eventually thrown out by the court after the EDN failed, twice, to inform the judge what it was that I wrote that was incorrect. I am a Dartmouth grad. This is outrageous.

I don't recall them being related.


David Chamberlain  college faculty • 10 hours ago
Well said, and I can attest to the fact of Susan's Indian ancestry. I am Indian, of Native Ancestry, and a Cousin of mine is Susans half-sister. We Eastern Lenape have no trouble accepting and knowing who we are.

David Chamberlain • 10 hours ago
This is the same old BS we Eastern Lenape have had to put up with for years from the Oklahoma & other so-called Real Tribes(because they are Federally Recognized). I've known Susan since she was a child. I know of her family's Native American ancestry. There is a relationship between her family and mine through her father, John. I am a Chief of the Big Horn Lenape, an Eastern Lenape Tribe. We make no claim to Federal Recognition. Our Eastern Lenape People were learning to speak the language and bringing back our traditions and culture way before the Oklahoma Lenape. Sure there are a very few non-Indian people in our Nations, don't all Nations/Tribes have the right to determine who their citizens are? Where were all of the so-called real Indians when we were fighting to protect Burial Grounds on the NY-PA border area? Onondaga came down, and didn't question our authenticity. I, like most of our Lenape People grew up proud and seeing our selves as Indian. We don't want or need Federal Recognition, nor do we want Casinos, like so many so-called Real Indians. Pompous fools like Mr. Leonard need to get their heads out of their Keisters. We, the Eastern Lenape Peoples, have been here, always will, we aren't going away. Our blood may be mixed, but our pride and knowledge of who we are passed down from generation to generation. I know nothing but good of Susan Taffe Reed and her work in bringing back the Language & traditions of our Lenape Ancestors. She will do a good job. You People who criticize her would do better to criticize yourself. Taapee! Enough!
Dartmouth, you've got the right person for the job!

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#4 Sep-18-2015 07:33:am

tree hugger
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

Direct URL for blog mentioned in article:

http://ancestorstealing.blogspot.com/20 … aware.html

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#5 Sep-18-2015 08:42:am

sschkaak
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

Treebeard writes:

"We know who we are. I am of the Big Horn Lenape Nation, and I grew up Native American, this is the identity I grew up with."

I also "knew" who I was.  I also grew up with a Native American identity.  DNA testing has proved that I did NOT know who I was.

And, I do NOT know that Treebeard or Susan Taffe Reed or any of the other undocumented claimants are Native American, since they have never produced any credible evidence that they are.  With the current availability of DNA testing, there is no need to remain undocumented.

Last edited by sschkaak (Sep-18-2015 08:43:am)

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#6 Sep-18-2015 08:45:am

tree hugger
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

Facebook page of Dartmouth's Native American Alumni Association

https://www.facebook.com/groups/61166877669/

A lot of interesting comments here. One stands out to me:



Nicky Michael Hi all. Yes. The Delaware Nation and Delaware Tribe in Oklahoma are considering presenting our protests in unity. The third Lenape, Stockbridge Munsee may or may not. The Munsee have been more open. Deb is correct. When I posted her hire announcements, my tribal members were very shocked and upset. While there are many legitimate claims to federal recognition, we only recognize a few as legitimate back east. This 501(c)3 is not one of them. They've used our Elders recordings without our permission, usurping the recordings and then applied and been awarded grants. If we post pics of our family, some use any those pictures to validate their connections as Lenape. I feel terrible about having to say these things. I don't like having to police people about identity as it can be so destructive in our communties. But when you see these services and now a position going to someone making these claims, I am simply heart broken. If she had gotten this position in her own right, I could swallow this news. To advertise and legitimize her is stealing from my people, family and children. Our Elders didn't suffer for others to finally gain these positions. Our Elders supported and got me through a PhD. Most of them passed away waiting for my book. I wish to thank Deb for alerting and asking me about this woman.

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#7 Sep-18-2015 04:23:pm

tree hugger
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

sschkaak wrote:

Treebeard writes:

"We know who we are. I am of the Big Horn Lenape Nation, and I grew up Native American, this is the identity I grew up with."

I also "knew" who I was.  I also grew up with a Native American identity.  DNA testing has proved that I did NOT know who I was.

And, I do NOT know that Treebeard or Susan Taffe Reed or any of the other undocumented claimants are Native American, since they have never produced any credible evidence that they are.  With the current availability of DNA testing, there is no need to remain undocumented.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/201 … -198146549


David Chamberlain  Bobby Joe • 2 hours ago
Even DNA tests aren't exact.

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#8 Sep-18-2015 05:26:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

They're a Hell of a lot more "exact" than old family tall tales.

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#9 Sep-19-2015 05:37:am

sschkaak
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

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#10 Sep-19-2015 07:39:am

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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

Just quoting article above: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 … -hire.html

Native Americans Blast Dartmouth for New Hire
The new director of Dartmouth’s Native American Program is causing controversy over her confusing—and possibly inaccurate—background.

A week ago, Dartmouth announced that ethnomusicologist Susan Taffe Reed is the new director of the college’s Native American Program, boasting that she is “the president of the Eastern Delaware Nations.”

But the Eastern Delaware Nations (EDN) is not a federally recognized Native American tribe, it’s a 501(c)(3) that also allows “members [who] are not of Native American descent, but [who] join as social members.” And, after a searing blog post unearthed alleged death certificates of Taffe’s ancestors that show her family coming to the U.S. from Ireland after the Indian Removal Act, Native American alumni of the college are protesting the hire on their Facebook page. Native American media is also scrutinizing Dartmouth’s decision to hire someone for a student affairs position who seems less than forthcoming about her own heritage.

The issue, they say, is not necessarily the EDN’s lack of federal recognition but a refusal of transparency on Taffe Reed’s part that recalls recent cases like disgraced former NAACP chapter president Rachel Dolezal and UC Riverside professor Andrea Smith, who continues to claim Cherokee identity despite backlash from Cherokee scholars and leaders.


Taffe Reed herself did not respond to The Daily Beast’s requests for comment but she did provide statements to Inside Higher Ed and local news outlet Valley News. In neither instance, did she specifically disprove the genealogy that has been posted online.

She told Inside Higher Ed, “My ties to all aspects of my identity are very important to me. Throughout this process, I have been forthright about my personal and professional experience. Given the history of this continent, it is not uncommon for Native identities to be mixed and complex.”

Dartmouth spokeswoman Diana Lawrence was more direct with Valley News, claiming that the genealogical blog post was inaccurate: “Susan Taffe Reed is of Native and European heritage. She has never represented herself as a member of a federal- or state-recognized tribe. She was transparent about her professional and personal experience throughout the search process. We are satisfied with the information she provided and are confident in her qualifications for this position.”
But, as the Valley News notes, Lawrence “did not specify the inaccuracies” with the blog post.

So far, the college is standing by its decision to hire Taffe Reed, recognizing the debate around her but insisting that “[i]t is not up to Dartmouth to determine which perspective is correct.” They further note that it is illegal to make hiring decisions based on ethnicity.

“While we recognize the legitimacy of the concern that individuals may falsely identify themselves as Native American, Dartmouth also understands that there are varying perspectives in the Native American community over what constitutes ethnicity, which is a separate issue from false claims of ethnicity,” the school’s official statement reads.


Lawrence told The Daily Beast that Taffe Reed “disclosed her heritage in her cover letter for the position” and provided a new and additional statement from Professor Bruce Duthu, head of the search committee for this position.

“Susan openly acknowledged that she is a person of mixed ancestry and identity, including Native ancestry,” Duthu wrote. “In the case of Native peoples (and other people of color), state records, including birth and death certificates, are notoriously unreliable sources of information about personal background. Likewise, there are serious problems with reliance on notions of ‘federal recognition’ as a measure of ‘authenticity’ since the standards for such recognition have been widely and consistently criticized by Native and non-Native scholars and activists alike ever since they were promulgated in 1978.”

But those questioning Taffe Reed’s new position say that her case is more clear-cut and does not hinge on questions of federal recognition.

It’s not just a case of federal recognition; we want to know who you are. What family do you come from?”
In one biography, Taffe Reed claims that she is “Turtle Clan and of Delaware, Irish, and German ancestry” and, in another, she lists herself as “Delaware (Turtle Clan). In a book chapter, she says that she is “related to Little Beaver.”

Dr. Nicky Kay Michael, a Native American historian and member of the federally recognized Delaware Tribal Council told The Daily Beast that she is very skeptical of Taffe Reed’s claim to be from the Turtle Clan if she is unwilling to openly discuss her heritage.

“When you say those things, that’s a red flag,” Michael said. “If you are Delaware, you’re going to have to say who your family is. It’s not just a case of federal recognition; we want to know who you are. What family do you come from?”


As Michael notes, the Delaware tribes in the United States that currently have federal recognition originally lived near the Delaware River but relocated west under pressure from the government beginning in the mid-eighteenth century. The Pennsylvania-based Eastern Delaware Nations group from which Taffe Reed hails claims on its website that most of its members are “descendants of Native Americans who lived in the Endless Mountains Region of Northeastern Pennsylvania and resisted being removed” but many in official Delaware tribes, Michael included, dispute the notion that a substantial number of Native Americans stayed behind in the Northeast.

“They don’t ask our permission to use our name and then they appropriate our culture,” Michael said of the EDN. “What [Taffe Reed] did is she basically used this 501(c)(3) as a forum and then she wrote articles claiming to be Delaware.” Michael does not speak for the Delaware Tribe but she says that an official statement is forthcoming.

The EDN did not respond to The Daily Beast’s request for comment on Taffe Reed.

Kerry Holton, president of the Delaware Nation—another federally recognized Delaware tribe—told The Daily Beast that he has been authorized to make official comments on the Dartmouth situation, and that he has so far been unsuccessful in his attempts to reach the college president.

Holton told The Daily Beast that he does not dispute Taffe Reed’s credentials per se but he does take exception to Dartmouth’s communication around Taffe Reed.

“It looks like she’s well-qualified for the position,” said Holton, “but they turned it into a questionable Native issue by mentioning the Eastern Delaware Nation, which is simply a charitable organization.”

Holton says that Dartmouth’s original announcement, which praised Taffe Reed for her “leadership roles in her Delaware tribal community,” was “misleading” because they failed to acknowledge that the EDN is a 501(c)(3)—and a controversial one at that—rather than a Native American tribe.

“I put a little bit of this responsibility on Dartmouth for the misleading way that they presented it,” he said. “And the fact that Susan has not been very forthcoming in trying to clarify anything—that, right there, just makes it even more suspicious and very difficult for me to swallow.”

Holton plans to send a letter to Dartmouth on Monday detailing the Delaware Nation’s concerns.

In the meantime, the Native American community at Dartmouth is questioning the hire on social media.

One student wrote into the alumni-run Dartblog claiming that the school sought the input of Native American students at a series of dinners with prospective candidates in late July. Although students “felt comfortable” with Taffe Reed, the student reports that “she wasn’t even our top candidate for the position and the primary reasons we liked her (despite a lack of experience for the position) are [now] being called into question.”

Alumni are also voicing their discontent on their public Facebook page, comparing Taffe Reed to former professor Ward Churchill and others who have made dubious claims of Native American ancestry. Some are planning to forward correspondence to Dartmouth trustees.

“You all have no idea what naming her to this position has done to validate decades of cultural thievery!” wrote Michele Leonard.

Alum Bear Christensen wrote, “I agree that this position does not require it to be a [N]ative person, but this is not the case of the ethnic makeup of a person, it is a case where someone has actively embraced and promoted a false cultural connection to give themselves an air of ‘cultural authority’ as a ‘selling point’ for her academic career.”

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#11 Sep-21-2015 06:00:pm

tree hugger
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

Full Article, photos and more: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.c … zal-161826

Susan Taffe Reed: Dartmouth’s Dolezal?

Jacqueline Keeler
9/21/15
The recent appointment by Dartmouth College of Susan Taffe Reed, President of the Eastern Delaware Nation, a non-profit entity, to the position of Native American Program director at the college has been met with shock that the head of a purportedly ‘fake tribe’ has been put in charge of the well-being of Native American students at one of the country’s preeminent Native American programs.

Historically, the Ivy League program founded in 1972 has had one of the highest retention and graduation rates of Native students in the country. The program director’s role has been to support the students through counseling, programming and as an advocate in the administration. The position has largely been filled by Native American alumni in the past due to their experience navigating the often alien environment of an isolated white, New England community marked by wealth, privilege and conservative politics.

Taffe Reed’s non-profit group, the Eastern Delaware Nation, was founded by her grandfather who claimed to be a descendent of a secret Lenape community that hid in plain sight by pretending to be white in Pennsylvania for 200 years after the Lenape people (the Delaware) were forced to leave. However, a website called FakeIndians aka www.ancestorystealing.com ran an exposé on February 12 just one day after Taffe Reed’s appointment that showed her great-great grandparents were born in Ireland.

In a 1993 Times Leader article, Taffe Reed’s late uncle, Michael “Medicine Shield” Taffe, who held the title of Supreme Chief of the Eastern Delaware, claims they are descendants of a Michael Taffe, a trader and interpreter who married an American Indian in 1735. Taffe says, “We know Taffe never left Pennsylvania.”

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#12 Sep-22-2015 09:57:am

sschkaak
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

I understand she's writing another article on this, as well.

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#13 Sep-22-2015 12:57:pm

Suckachsinheet
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

So, Wayandaga is her grandfather too?


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#14 Sep-22-2015 01:07:pm

tree hugger
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

sschkaak wrote:

I understand she's writing another article on this, as well.

Cool.

Suckachsinheet wrote:

So, Wayandaga is her grandfather too?

I think she was talking about her biological Irish grandfather but he wasn't the founder. Hard to keep up.  Wayandaga did seem to draw in a lot of 'grandchildren' though.

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#15 Sep-22-2015 01:14:pm

sschkaak
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

They're using "Grandfather" as an honorific.

(I see Treebeard and someone named "Sammy" have commented, now.)

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#16 Sep-22-2015 01:27:pm

tree hugger
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

Comments from ICT article. For reader's clarification- David Chamberlain is Treebeard. I feel it pertinent as he claims to be related to Susan Taffe.

Big Horn Lenape/Tree Beard: http://www.woodlandindians.org/forums/v … hp?id=8669

Treebeard - In his own words: http://www.woodlandindians.org/forums/v … hp?id=8827

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.c … zal-161826

Sammy7
What is a fake Indian? To me a Christian Indian is a fake Indian. Are you Christian? If so, why are you faking it? Be truthful, you have accepted a middle eastern historical prophet as your God. What about Native American Prophets? Why have you chosen not to follow them? Are they not the true carriers of our spiritual beliefs? Is the PowWow the only event with sacred elements you attend? How much Indian does that make you? Not much in my opinion. Does dancing Hiphop or playing the Blues make you Indian? These rhythms are birthed in African culture, and the Blues by second generation American slaves reflecting West African cultural traditions. Do Black people say that you are fake Black’s? A great many outlander people with American Indian Heritage increasingly choose NOT to join their tribe because the tribes, in their opinion, are assimilated. The tribal people are Christian, stress competition and not cooperation, do not practice reciprocity, do not know their traditional sacred rituals, ceremonies, or language. Tribal Clan’s and clan responsibilities have been abandoned and forgotten. Judgmentalism is rampant. Does being born on a rez or in a territory, being enrolled in your tribe and believing and behaving like a re-made White man make you Indian? What right, if any, do you have to judge others? If a person has Indian heritage no matter how far back, is their blood or spirit memory any less real than that of a largely assimilated tribal citizen? If they have been taught the Traditional culture and experienced it and grown in it over time, are they less Indian than a Tribal citizen? Are the Tribes not Government recognized? Do they not derive their status from the U.S. Government? I would propose that outlander unenrolled people, with thinner blood but strong Traditional cultural beliefs and lifeways, who are living in communities as free and independent peoples, unencumbered by governmental or Tribal recognition, are in fact the American Indian’s following most closely the lifeways of our Ancestors and are more true to our American Indian cultural heritage than are most Tribal citizens. We are not stealing your culture, we are reclaiming our’s. So, who is a fake?
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Mon, 09/21/2015 - 15:06

David Chamberlain
Get your facts straight. Backtracking? We have been involved with Onondaga Nation's Paul Waterman(now deceased) with every Burial Grounds Case our Big Horn Lenape Nation was involved in the 1990's. Also, we do not charge applicants for enrollment into our Nation! If they can't find it, we can procure it for them at cost. Why do you use David Smith to try and blacken the EDN in people's eyes? Like I'm sure they condoned this! The Creation of these Tribes is abusive? As Lenape descendants we have every right to immerse ourselves in the Culture & Traditions. We've been around for 40 years! And we haven't abused anyone.
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Mon, 09/21/2015 - 18:05

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#17 Sep-22-2015 07:44:pm

Suckachsinheet
Member
Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 975

Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

...nvm...

Last edited by Suckachsinheet (Sep-22-2015 07:46:pm)


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#18 Sep-24-2015 05:03:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4365

Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

Missed this one.  At the end of that Inside Higher Ed article, David Chamberlain writes:

"I speak German too. It's how I've translated the Moravian Delaware Language material of Zeisberger , Heckewelder, etc"

neutral

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#19 Sep-25-2015 11:46:am

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11110

Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

sschkaak wrote:

Missed this one.  At the end of that Inside Higher Ed article, David Chamberlain writes:

"I speak German too. It's how I've translated the Moravian Delaware Language material of Zeisberger , Heckewelder, etc"

neutral

neutral  Uhhh

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#20 Oct-02-2015 06:34:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4365

Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

Reassigned: Susan Taffe Reed No Longer Dartmouth’s Native Program Director

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.c … tor-161940




ICTMN Staff



10/1/15




Inge-Lise Ameer, the Vice Provost for Student Affairs, sent an email to students October 1 explaining that Susan Taffe Reed will no long continue as the director of the Native American Program. But, she hasn’t been fired, simply reassigned.

“We recognize that the distraction of media coverage and questions about her appointment have been challenging for all you,” reads the email. “While Susan remains an employee of the College, we have made other arrangements to support the Native American Program going forward.”

It is not clear what exactly Taffe Reed will be doing, but the primary contacts for Native American Program students will be NAP Coordinator Kianna Burke, who is a 2012 Dartmouth graduate with a degree in Native American Studies, and Interim Undergraduate Dean Jeremy Guardiola.

Taffe Reed’s appointment to the position was met with shock that the head of a purportedly ‘fake tribe’—the Eastern Delaware Nation—would be in charge of the well-being of Native American students at one of the country’s preeminent Native American programs.

Dr. Nicky Michael, a tribal councilwoman for Delaware Tribe of Indians in Oklahoma and Stanford alum was surprised to have her post questioning Taffe Reed’s appointment deleted from Dartmouth’s Native American Program Facebook page. She wrote, “Her [Taffe Reed’s] identification and your promotion of her as a Delaware is appropriation and cultural theft of our language, culture and identity. When people make false claims to Lenape heritage, those of us fighting in our own communities lose out on those same opportunities. I am saddened, disturbed and shocked at this decision.”

Dartmouth kept quiet about the situation until reassigning Taffe Reed.

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#21 Oct-02-2015 10:47:am

tree hugger
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Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 … ribes.html

FRAUD10.02.151:00 AM ET
The Real Problem With Susan Taffe Reed and Fake Indian Tribes
After weeks of criticism, Dartmouth finally removed ‘fake Indian’ Susan Taffe Reed as president of its Native American program. But what makes a ‘real’ tribe?

When Dartmouth proudly announced its new Native American Program director, Susan Taffe Reed, it did not expect to find itself at odds with Native Americans across the country, faced with the accusation of hiring a member of a “fake Indian tribe.” After weeks of controversy, the college announced on Oct. 1 that Taffe Reed was no longer the director.

Taffe Reed is the president of the Eastern Delaware Nation, Inc., a nonprofit founded by her grandfather, Thomas Taffe, who claimed to be the descendent of Delaware Indians (who hid out in Pennsylvania by passing as white people for 200 years). However, the Native American blog FakeIndians published research on Taffe’s genealogy, claiming he was the grandson of recent Irish immigrants. The federally recognized Delaware tribes, which were removed from their homelands in Pennsylvania 200 years ago, do not recognize the non-profit to be a legitimate unrecognized Delaware tribe.

Dartmouth’s Native American Program boasts one of the highest graduation rates of Native American students (81.1 percent) and is by far one of the oldest and largest in the country. The NAP director is often the first person Native American students turn to on campus to find social support, direction, and an ally in the administration.

“My tribe was not federally recognized until recently,” said Michelle Leonard, Shinnecock, former director of the Urban Indian Center of Philadelphia. She often found herself at odds with the Taffe family in the 1990’s. “If it meant you would understand the definitions and dichotomies that are involved, I would give up my recognition so that fakes like them are not recognized.”

Professor Bruce Duthu, who chaired the search committee and is, himself, a member of unrecognized tribe the Houma of Louisiana, noted in his only statement so far to the media:

“In the case of Native peoples (and other people of color), state records, including birth and death certificates, are notoriously unreliable sources of information about personal background. Likewise, there are serious problems with reliance on notions of “federal recognition” as a measure of “authenticity” since the standards for such recognition have been widely and consistently criticized by Native and non-Native scholars and activists alike ever since they were promulgated in 1978.”

The question that arises is, is it even possible to tell the difference between the two—a real tribe that is politically unrecognized and a fake tribe composed of “pretendians” and “wannabes”? Native American scholars and tribal members who spoke to The Daily Beast repeatedly spoke of the importance of documentation in proving the persistence of tribal nations.

Keely Squirrel Denning, a Shawnee tribal genealogist who conducted the research on Taffe Reed for FakeIndians, responded to Duthu’s statement saying, “No true researcher ever relies upon just one record.”

She examined more than just Taffe family death records. Census lists also show that the Taffe family listed Irish birthplaces, and all documentation supports their claims to recent Irish ancestry. In contrast, Denning examines Duthu’s family documentation, which, despite his tribe’s unrecognized status, clearly and consistently identifies his ancestors as Indian.
Dr. Nicky Michael, councilwoman of the federally-recognized tribe the Delaware Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma, concurs: “There is an inherent culture [in a genuine, unrecognized tribe] they don’t have to go someone else’s tribe they don’t have to steal. That’s the difference. That’s how you can tell. It’s inherent already. The Nanticoke [in New Jersey] do have Native blood and are real. They don’t know their culture so they ask permission to study our culture. That’s the correct way to do it.”

Political recognition by the United States is possible even for first-contact tribes that have languished for centuries without it. On July 2, Pocahontas’ tribe, the Pamunkey, finally received federal recognition that will take effect this week. Kevin Washburn, assistant secretary for Indian Affairs, told The Washington Post that the tribe, “submitted a petition that is frankly one of the most well-documented petitions we’ve ever received.”

The Bureau of Indian Affairs found that the Pamunkey met all the criteria for federal recognition, which includes: 1) demonstrating the tribe comprises a distinct community that has existed from historical times to the present day; 2) retaining political influence over its members; 3) maintaining a governing document; 4) and proving that current members descend from a historic tribe.

Ironically, the tribe’s website already has a disclaimer that an “individual known and/or self-proclaimed as Crown Prince Emperor El Bey Bigbay (or other variations of this name) and also known as William McRae, is not associated in any manner with the Pamunkey Indian Tribe/Nation nor the Pamunkey Tribal Government, despite statements made by this individual and/or others, either spoken or written, to include the Facebook identity, ‘Pamunkey Nation.’”

Kerry Holton, the president of the Delaware Nation of Oklahoma (which is federally recognized) told The Daily Beast, “Dartmouth’s original announcement, which praised Taffe Reed for her ‘leadership roles in her Delaware tribal community,’ was misleading,” because they equated her experience with EDN, a non-profit, with that of working in an actual Native American nation.

Holton told The Daily Beast, “This whole situation goes to the heart of that matter: tribal sovereignty. Cultural and sovereignty appropriation. We didn’t leave anyone behind. The Delaware signed 48 treaties with the United States and migrated further than another tribe. In our treaties, if any Indian didn’t want to move, you surrendered your Indian identity and became a U.S. citizen.”

He also pointed out that state recognition does not always include the same criteria as federal recognition and in some cases, require no documentation at all. Holton notes that in one case, a governor signed “a resolution to acknowledge this was supposedly a tribe,” but admitted he knew nothing about the claimant group.

The Cherokee Nation has compiled a list of 212 fake Cherokee tribes across the country and passed a joint “Resolution Opposing Fabricated Cherokee ‘Tribes’ and ‘Indians’” in 2008. The Cherokee have also joined together with the Delaware and the Shawnee to fight the recognition of a “fake tribe” in Illinois (HB 3217). The tribe addressed concerns with state recognition, “The Federal Recognition Process requires extensive documentation, including verification of continuous existence as an Indian tribe since 1900… States do not have such a relationship. Historically and legally, states have been excluded from dealing with Indian nations. The foundation for state exclusion is rooted in the Constitution of the United States, effectively making state recognition unconstitutional.”

And these pretender groups are using any form of state recognition to push for more of a seat at the table. Some have even pushed for the rights to Native American remains and artifacts. This is particularly painful to tribes likes the Delaware, who have been removed from their homelands. To fight this, the Delaware tribes have opened two NAGPRA (Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act) offices in Pennsylvania.

“This is happening to so many tribes. They find this artifact and they don’t know what it means and I don’t tell them,” says Michael, who wrote her doctoral thesis on Delaware culture and removal. “I feel it is not any of their business—it’s not their ancestors. And I struggle. I would like to teach, but when we open ourselves up to not just appropriation but bastardization of our culture. That is what Susan Taffe Reed is doing.”

Ben Barnes, a Shawnee leader who has been battling fake tribes in Ohio, has thought a lot about what motivates these “culture vultures.” “A friend who teaches psychology in a college said it is probably either unconscious or conscious lying,” Barnes says.

He also makes a correlation to the American practice of Native mascotry, a practice as American as apple pie. “It’s all tied together with [the] mascot... that noble savage narrative. This appropriation undercuts what a tribe is. A tribe is a sovereign nation and has a sovereign to sovereign relationship with other nations.”

“The depth and energy it takes for them to perpetuate this falsehood is beyond reasoning.” Leonard says, “It’s hurt those who need that legitimacy. Look at how long it took the Pamunkeys to get recognition.”

Holton believes that tribes should play a role in, and perhaps even develop their own system of, recognizing federally-unrecognized tribes. When he and Michael spoke to Dartmouth Vice Provost Inge-Lise Ameer last week, they asked if the college had considered calling the Delaware Tribe. Michael said Ameer sounded taken aback and admitted she had not.

The Delaware tribal leaders were told they would hear back from Dartmouth last Friday with the college’s decision about what they will do in this hiring debacle. However, the college did not call. Shawnee leader Barnes (his tribe is also listed on EDN’s site as one of 12 tribes they represent) called Dartmouth on Monday and was told an announcement would be coming midweek.

Michael believes that if Dartmouth had better communications in place with actual tribes they could have avoided this debacle altogether. And now that they are searching again for a Native American Program director, her advice is: “Hire a real Delaware!”

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#22 Jan-13-2016 10:34:am

tree hugger
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Posts: 11110

Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

It never ends......

Full Post : http://ancestorstealing.blogspot.com/

It is a slap in the face to the Indian students, and it has many Indian parents asking themselves if they want their kids to go to Dartmouth.

Susan Taffe-Reed, the fake Delaware Lenape, has now been named "undergraduate Dean" at Dartmouth, and she has not even been at Dartmouth, what? Four months? And she is now "undergraduate Dean"?

Wow, what kind of contract did Dartmouth sign with her? Do they not have a clause in their contracts for dishonesty?

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#23 Jan-14-2016 12:49:am

Suckachsinheet
Member
Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 975

Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

I was unaware that an undergraduate dean needed to be able to pshcyanalyze the students. Are the students of Dartmouth psychotic? I'm afraid Sam went over the top on that point. I'm rerasonably confident she would be able to fill that role adequately, were it not for the level of mistrust she already engendered. Kind of a mixed bag...


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#24 Jan-14-2016 04:00:pm

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11110

Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

Suckachsinheet wrote:

I was unaware that an undergraduate dean needed to be able to pshcyanalyze the students. Are the students of Dartmouth psychotic? I'm afraid Sam went over the top on that point. I'm rerasonably confident she would be able to fill that role adequately, were it not for the level of mistrust she already engendered. Kind of a mixed bag...

People in that position council students, refer them to social programs and have to keep their confidentiality. I'd say she definitely needs qualifications in Psychology.

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#25 Jan-15-2016 06:47:am

tree hugger
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Posts: 11110

Re: Susan Taffe Reed - UDN President - Dartmouth Director of NA Studies

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~upperde/advising/

UNDERGRADUATE DEANS OFFICE: ACADEMIC, PERSONAL, AND SOCIAL ADVISING
The Undergraduate Deans support and advise students on all issues relevant to a successful college experience, in particular those that may impact academic success. These issues can include academic and major planning, balancing social activity, relations with faculty,  roommate & family conflicts, campus adjustment or environment difficulties, medical or health problems, inability to complete a course, and many others.
They also help students navigate Dartmouth academic policies and procedures.

Ultimately, the role of the Undergraduate Deans Office in the academic development of students is to help them to function independently—to be able to locate resources, to access information and to act in their own interests.

I think integrity and honesty is a big part of it too. Guess that's irrelevant with Reed though.

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