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#1 May-25-2013 09:51:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4047
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Onondaga Dictionary

This looks like a great book.  Ove 1,500 pages!  And, this is the cheapest price I could find.  (The Canadian dollar is worth about 97 U.S. cents, right now.)

Onondaga-English / English-Onondaga Dictionary, by Hanni Woodbury

http://www.amazon.ca/Onondaga-English-E … dictionary

P.S. - I know next-to-nothing about the Onondaga language.  Just trying to generate some new interest in this forum.

Last edited by sschkaak (May-25-2013 09:52:pm)

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#2 May-26-2013 08:14:pm

Chevy
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Registered: Aug-01-2007
Posts: 1575

Re: Onondaga Dictionary

sschkaak, do you remember when we posted on aitf, and chickie, or someone, posted an article about hunting grounds, and how they were marked??? I don't know if the article came out of the U.S., or Canada. Do you have any recollection of it? I really wish I could find it again. It seems like the hunting grounds was in the U.S., and perhaps near the Great Lakes, but I can't remember.

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#3 May-26-2013 09:18:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4047
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Re: Onondaga Dictionary

Sorry, Chevy.  I don't recall that.

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#4 May-26-2013 10:19:pm

Chevy
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Registered: Aug-01-2007
Posts: 1575

Re: Onondaga Dictionary

sad I was hoping someone would remember it. Thanks, anyway, sschkaak.

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#5 May-26-2013 11:01:pm

Suckachsinheet
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Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 958

Re: Onondaga Dictionary

Would you mean the practice of marking hunting ground boundaries with rock cairns?


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#6 May-26-2013 11:37:pm

Chevy
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Registered: Aug-01-2007
Posts: 1575

Re: Onondaga Dictionary

Perhaps, but as I remember the article, it gave the "marks' that individuals used to "sign their name", example a "mark", that meant "Beaver" being their name. That's simplified... It was a really great article, and either chickie or prancy posted it. Something along this line, only this is much simpler

http://www.fee.org/the_freeman/detail/p … z2USa1Uduz

Indian land tenure systems were varied. While some ownership was completely or almost completely communal, other ownership was more like todayís fee simple.[2] The degree of private ownership reflected the scarcity of land and the difficulty or ease of defining and enforcing rights.

Because agricultural land required investments and because boundaries could be easily marked, crop land was often privately owned, usually by families or clans rather than individuals. For example, families among the Mahican Indians in the Northeast possessed hereditary rights to use well-defined tracts of garden land along the rivers. Europeans recognized this ownership, and deeds of white settlers indicate that they usually approached lineage leaders to purchase this land. Prior to European contact, other Indian tribes recognized Mahican ownership of these lands by not trespassing.[3]

(I'm not saying this article is correct, just what I could find to post to give an example.)

Read more: http://www.fee.org/the_freeman/detail/p … z2USbGrkU0

Hunting, Trapping, and Fishing

Customary rights governed hunting, trapping, and fishing. These rights were often expressed in terms of religion and spirituality rather than of science as we understand it today, writes Peter Usher. Nonetheless, the rules conserved the resource base and harmony within the band.[6]

Hunting groups among the Montagnais-Naskapi of Quebec between Hudson Bay and the Gulf of St. Lawrence recognized family and clan hunting areas, particularly for beaver when it became an important trade item.[7] Similar hunting groups and rules existed in other regions. In New Brunswick, report anthropologists Frank G. Speck and Wendell S. Hadlock,[8] some of the men held districts which had been hunted by their fathers, and presumably their grandfathers. They even had a colloquial term that translates to my hunting ground.

The Algonkian Indians from the Atlantic to the Great Lakes carried on their hunting in restricted, family hunting territories descending from generation to generation in the male line, says Speck.[9] It was in these family tracts that the supply of game animals was maintained by deliberate systems of rotation in hunting and gathering, and defended by the family groups as a heritage from some remote time when the country had been given to their ancestors by the Creator.

The article may have come from a Museum, or University.... it was about a particular territory, and the "marks" and their meanings, that were used to mark individual territories.

IF I saved it, I may never find it again. sad

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#7 May-26-2013 11:39:pm

Chevy
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Registered: Aug-01-2007
Posts: 1575

Re: Onondaga Dictionary

Here's the notes at the bottom. I'll post them, so maybe later I can check them out, and if anyone else wants to they can.

1. Paul S. Wilson, What Chief Seattle Said, Environmental Law 22 (1992), pp. 1451-1468, at 1457.

2. John M. Copper, Indian Land Tenure Systems, in Indians of the United States, 1949 (Contributions by Members of the Delegation, and by Advisers to the Policy Board of the National Indian Institute, for the Second Inter-American Conference on Indian Life, Cuzco, Peru.)

3. Ted J. Brasser, Riding on the Frontierís Crest: Mahican Indian Culture and Culture Change. Paper No. 13 (Ottawa: National Museum of Canada, Ethnology Division, 1974), p. 14.

4. Brasser, p. 7.

5. Angie Debo, A History of the Indians of the United States (Norman, Okla.: University of Oklahoma Press, 1970), pp. 13-14.

6. Peter J. Usher, Property as the Basis of Inuit Hunting Rights, in Property Rights and Indian Economies, ed. by Terry L. Anderson (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1992), p. 50.

7. Edward S. Rogers and J. Garth Taylor, Northern Ojibwa, in Handbook of North American Indians-Subarctic, Vol. 6 (Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution, 1981), p. 181.

8. Frank G. Speck and Wendell S. Hadlock, A Report on Tribal Boundaries and Hunting Areas of the Malecite Indians of New Brunswick, American Anthropologist, Vol. 48, No. 3 (1946), p. 362.

9. Frank G. Speck, Aboriginal Conservators, Bird Lore, Vol. 40 (1939), pp. 258-259.

10. Julian H. Steward, Basin-Plateau Aboriginal Sociopolitical Groups, Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 120 (Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1938), p. 253.

11. John C. Ewers, The Horse in Blackfoot Indian Culture (Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1969), p. 160.

12. Ewers, p. 162.

13. Anthony Netboy, Salmon of the Pacific Northwest: Fish vs. Dams (Portland, Ore.: Binfords & Mort, 1958), p. 11.

14. Robert Higgs, Legally Induced Technical Regress in the Washington Salmon Fishery, Research in Economic History, Vol. 7 (1982), pp. 55-86, at 59.

Read more: http://www.fee.org/the_freeman/detail/p … z2USd9uo1l

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#8 May-27-2013 09:48:am

Chevy
Member
Registered: Aug-01-2007
Posts: 1575

Re: Onondaga Dictionary

Not it, but interesting.

Occupying the Land: Traditional Patterns of Land and Resource Ownership among
First Peoples of British Columbia
Nancy J. Turner and James T. Jones
School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria,
Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada

http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/dlc/bitstre … sequence=1

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