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#26 Sep-03-2010 06:32:pm

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

Ten Cherokees wrote and signed the illegal Treaty of New Echota. There was no authority to convene a Cherokee Council Meeting. The Cherokees who signed this treaty violated tribal law and the most fundamental principals of government.

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#27 Sep-18-2010 09:48:am

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

Traditional Religious Beliefs of the Cherokee

A-ne-jo-di, or Stickball, is a very rough game played by not only the Cherokee, but many other Southeastern Woodland tribes including the Muscogee (Creek), Seminole, and others.

The game resembles the modern European game of LaCrosse, using ball sticks which are handmade from hickory. A small ball, made of deer hair and hide, is tossed into the air by the medicine man. The male players use a pair of the sticks, and female players use the bare hands. In earlier times, only the men with the greatest athletic ability played the game. The game was oftentimes played to settle disputes, and the conjurer for each team often became as important to the team as the players themselves.

Seven points are scored when the ball strikes a wooden fish on the top of a pole approximately 25 feet in height, and two points are awarded when the ball strikes the pole.

In earlier days, there would be a dance before the ballgame. The ballplayers were the participants of the dance, along with seven women dancers. Each woman represented one of the clans. Throughout the dance, the women would step on black beads which represented the players of the opposing team. The conjurer had placed these black beads on a large flat rock. Today, stickball is an important part of the days activities at ceremonial Stomp Grounds, being necessary to play before the Stomp Dance can ever begin. It is also a recreational sport at other times between community teams. There are also intertribal teams made up of players from Cherokee, Muscogee (Creek), Yuchi, Natchez, and other area communities.

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#28 Sep-18-2010 09:51:am

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

1993: Cherokee Nation signs self-governance compact with Indian Health Service.

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#29 Sep-24-2010 04:37:pm

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

In 1825, the governor of Gerogia showed respect to the Cherokee Nation by mandating - This is my proclamation: all persons shall refrain from trespassing on lands occupied by the Indians. We will expose agressors to punishment by authorities. We shall treat the treaties as the supreme law.

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#30 Oct-02-2010 04:16:pm

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

In compensation for the Removals, the official language stipulated, 'claims for improvements is deducted from the money paid to the Cherokee'. Therefore, the United States did not pay for our removal, we paid for it ourselves.

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#31 Oct-09-2010 11:42:am

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

In the late 1700's the Cherokee population was approximately 12,000. This meant 1 Cherokee for each 6 square miles. Although the Europeans considered this a land surplus, it was a necessary amount of land for hunting and gathering.

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#32 Oct-16-2010 11:19:am

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

1984: Ross Swimmer resigns to head Bureau of Indian Affairs after begin appointed by President Ronald Reagan to be Assistant Secretary of the Department of Interior.

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#33 Oct-26-2010 10:27:am

bls926
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From: Texas
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Posts: 12082

Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

Traditional Religious Beliefs of the Cherokee

A-ne-jo-di, or Stickball, is a very rough game played by not only the Cherokee, but many other Southeastern Woodland tribes including the Muscogee (Creek), Seminole, and others.

The game resembles the modern European game of LaCrosse, using ball sticks which are handmade from hickory. A small ball, made of deer hair and hide, is tossed into the air by the medicine man. The male players use a pair of the sticks, and female players use the bare hands. In earlier times, only the men with the greatest athletic ability played the game. The game was oftentimes played to settle disputes, and the conjurer for each team often became as important to the team as the players themselves.

Seven points are scored when the ball strikes a wooden fish on the top of a pole approximately 25 feet in height, and two points are awarded when the ball strikes the pole.

In earlier days, there would be a dance before the ballgame. The ballplayers were the participants of the dance, along with seven women dancers. Each woman represented one of the clans. Throughout the dance, the women would step on black beads which represented the players of the opposing team. The conjurer had placed these black beads on a large flat rock. Today, stickball is an important part of the days activities at ceremonial Stomp Grounds, being necessary to play before the Stomp Dance can ever begin. It is also a recreational sport at other times between community teams. There are also intertribal teams made up of players from Cherokee, Muscogee (Creek), Yuchi, Natchez, and other area communities.



*NOTE*  This is a duplicate of the Cultural Tidbit posted on 9/18/10. Have to blame the Cherokee Phoenix; I copy and paste what is printed in each week's issue. Not sure why they chose to reuse this one so soon. Thanks for catching this, Blacksmith.

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#34 Nov-01-2010 01:50:pm

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

Nine hundred Cherokee men died in the War Between the States (Civil War), and countless women and children. The Cherokee Nation suffered more per capita than any state during the war, and were involved in the conflict as a foreign ally.

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#35 Nov-10-2010 09:22:am

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

The loss of restricted trust Indian land progressed from 1907 through 1948 at the rate of about 80,000 acres annually in Eastern Oklahoma.

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#36 Nov-14-2010 11:45:am

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

Chief C.J. Harris worked on plans for a Cherokee emigration to the Mexican state of Sinaloa in 1895. Later, further plans to emigrate to Mexico were made. All 5 civilized tribes purchased 9,000 acres north of Tampica for settlement in 1901.

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#37 Dec-07-2010 10:04:am

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

1997: Factionalism occurs among three branches of the Cherokee Nation government. Chief Joe Byrd's office is investigated by tribal marshals for allegedly misappropriating funds. The marshals are fired by the chief and the investigation sets off a two-year struggle between the three branches.

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#38 Jan-08-2011 11:56:am

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

1993: Cherokee Nation signs self-governance compact with Indian Health Service.

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#39 Jan-08-2011 11:59:am

bls926
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From: Texas
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Posts: 12082

Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

In the late 1800's, many non-Indians on the other side of the Cherokee Nation border began paying tuition to have their children sent to Cherokee schools, as they were considered academically superior. One school with a large student body of these students was Muddy Springs, south of Stilwell. This school had a large number of students from Evansville, Arkansas. Evansville was a thriving metropolis which provided outfitting for Indian Territory. Muddy Springs was only 12 miles from Evansville, with transportation of the white children by wagons. The tuition was $2.00 per month, provided the white student could 'stay up' with the Cherokee students.

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#40 Jan-08-2011 12:02:pm

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

1865-66: Cherokees must negotiate peace with U.S. government. New treaty limits tribal land rights, eliminating possibility of Cherokee state, and is a prelude to the Dawes Commission Rolls and the break-up of Cherokee tribal lands by allotment. John Ross dies in 1866.

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#41 Jan-08-2011 12:06:pm

bls926
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From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

Nine hundred Cherokee men died in the War Between the States (Civil War), and countless women and children. The Cherokee Nation suffered more per capita than any state during the war, and were involved in the conflict as a foreign ally.

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#42 Jan-22-2011 12:32:pm

bls926
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Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

1893: Cherokee Outlet opened for white settlement; Dawes Commission arrives.

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#43 Feb-02-2011 09:15:am

bls926
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Posts: 12082

Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

The Cherokee society is traditionally a matrilineal society. The women passed the clan to their children, and owned the property. It was the responsibility of her oldest brother to teach her children of Cherokee traditions and spirituality. The method of divorce was for the woman to pack up the man's clothing, and set it outside of the house.

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#44 Feb-28-2011 11:53:am

bls926
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From: Texas
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Posts: 12082

Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

1992: Chief Mankiller signs tribal-state tobacco compact. The compact gives smoke shops within the tribe's jurisdiction the right to sell non-taxed tobacco products to non-Indians in exchange for an "in lieu" payment from state; Chief signs cooperative law enforcement agreement which provides for cross-deputization of all law enforcement agencies with Cherokee Marshal Service.

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#45 Mar-21-2011 11:00:am

bls926
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Posts: 12082

Re: Cultural Tidbits

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/newsletter/culturaltidbits.gif

1877: General Allotment Act passed which required individual ownership of lands once held in common by Indian tribes.

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