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#1 Feb-26-2009 02:59:pm

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

some Munsee recordings...

These are all Christian recordings but the story of "Noah" is in the Munsee Language with English translations, was interesting to me:
http://globalrecordings.net/program/C17751

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#2 Feb-26-2009 04:06:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4396

Re: some Munsee recordings...

The voice is that of the late Emily Johnson of the Moraviantown Delaware.

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#3 Feb-26-2009 04:31:pm

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

Re: some Munsee recordings...

this may also be of interest, it is an online version of the book Morning and evening prayer, the administration of the sacraments, and certain other rites and ceremonies of the Church of England [microform] : together with hymns (Munsee and English) (1886)

http://www.archive.org/details/cihm_00641

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#4 Feb-26-2009 05:34:pm

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4396

Re: some Munsee recordings...

Most of the hymns were translated by Charles Halfmoon, and were first published in 1842.  The Munsee prayer book is, basically, the same as an edition published in 1847.  So, they have some words you won't find in O'Meara's dictionary, or among the last speakers, today.  For instance, the old words for "big mountain" and "hill."  The hymns are very difficult to read (though not impossible) because all the syllables are separated, but it's often hard to tell where the word divisions are.  The prayer book is easier to read.  These works are the earliest extensive narratives in the Munsee dialect.  As such, they are extremely important.

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#5 Feb-26-2009 05:36:pm

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

Re: some Munsee recordings...

sschkaak wrote:

Most of the hymns were translated by Charles Halfmoon, and were first published in 1842.  The Munsee prayer book is, basically, the same as an edition published in 1847.  So, they have some words you won't find in O'Meara's dictionary, or among the last speakers, today.  For instance, the old words for "big mountain" and "hill."  The hymns are very difficult to read (though not impossible) because all the syllables are separated, but it's often hard to tell where the word divisions are.  The prayer book is easier to read.  These works are the earliest extensive narratives in the Munsee dialect.  As such, they are extremely important.

Thanks Sschkaak!!

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#6 Dec-12-2009 10:09:pm

Chevy
Member
Registered: Aug-01-2007
Posts: 1577

Re: some Munsee recordings...

I have a question, if you don't mind.

http://content.wisconsinhistory.org/cdm … SHOW=28116

Is this Mohican, or Mohegan?

It kind of compares with Carl Masthay, Schmick's Mahican Dictionary. American Philosphical Society, so I think Edwards' is Mohican, but I'm not sure!

Thanks, Martha.

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#7 Dec-12-2009 10:19:pm

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4396

Re: some Munsee recordings...

Mahican (i.e., "Mohican").

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#8 Dec-12-2009 10:24:pm

Chevy
Member
Registered: Aug-01-2007
Posts: 1577

Re: some Munsee recordings...

Thank you, thank you, thank you!cooltongue

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#9 Dec-12-2009 10:54:pm

Chevy
Member
Registered: Aug-01-2007
Posts: 1577

Re: some Munsee recordings...

These are all Christian recordings but the story of "Noah" is in the Munsee Language with English translations, was interesting to me:
http://globalrecordings.net/program/C17751


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These are awesome; thanks y'all.

Martha

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