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#1 Jan-22-2009 09:56:am

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

"...a full-blooded American Indian..." LOL

http://www.phoenixvillenews.com/article … 542273.txt

Thursday, January 22, 2009 6:13 AM EST

What a wonderful story to start 2009: the airline pilot deserves a postage stamp photo for this year. The word is out: some postage stamps this year will honor TV stars such as those appearing in "I Love Lucy,'' "Dragnet,'' "Hopalong Cassidy'' and "Ed Sullivan Show.'' How about one for Chesley Sullenberger who saved 155 passengers by gliding his plane into the Hudson River after the plane suffered a bird strike.

Within a week, we've had a heroic rescue story, Martin Luther King Day and the inspiring inauguration of a new president.

Another hero we could put on a stamp would be the friendly American Indian. A postal clerk told me she knew of Indian blankets on a stamp, but no Native American. So many different types of Indians were in early America.

Lean back with me to the year 2000. The Historical Society of the Phoenixville Area had one of the largest turnouts ever at their annual banquet.

Doris Riverbird Woman, a full-blooded American Indian of the Eastern Lenapi Nation of Pennsylvania (the Delawares) and eight other Indians were on the program menu.
The group, dressed in traditional and modern garb, entertained and informed with songs and lore. They displayed artifacts that including arrowheads, furs, instruments and tools.

Riverbird's startling comment, during a rather long program, was "If you call me a savage, I will knock you down.'' (No one called her a savage.)

You may have read it before, but Penn found the Delawares: peaceful, generous and revengeful. When the first European settlers came to Manavon (another name for Phoenixville) about 1713, an Indian village existed on the low land near the Schuylkill River just south of Pickering Creek's mouth.

A trail extended from this village across the creek below the mill at Moore Hall, and then by Corner Stores (Route 23 and Whitehorse Road), the Morris estate and the Yellow Springs to a large and permanent settlement called Indian Town.

There also was an encampment or village upon the eastern bank of the Schuylkill River extending southward from the canal basin at Mont Clare. Communications between the two villages were maintained continually, except when the river had risen too high to prevent it. Fifty-six stone blades were found here.

Tradition says that the locality about the mouth of the Pickering was a favorite place to gather for the Indians and the amount of arrowheads scattered about Green Hill, a mile below Phoenixville, would seem to prove that (Dr. Lola Reed told me that Green Hill is east of Phoenixville behind the McAvoy Brickyard, and not very big.) Sam Pennypacker found a hammer of neatly fashioned quartz here.

About 1770, it was common for the Indians to gather at Corner Stores (still the same name today) and practice bow and arrow shooting at a target for a coin. At a distance of 50 yards, Indians could hit a coin almost perfectly. With each year, as white settlers increased, Indians decreased. At the time of the French and Indian War, the Indians left, but after the restoration of peace, returned annually.

In the autumn of 1773, when the time for departure arrived, an old brave and his squaw declared last farewells and awaited stoically the blows of the tomahawks which were to end their lives. The rest of the tribe performed this final duty without compunction, and, having buried their bodies, continued west.

The Lenni Lenape tribe, a branch of the Delawares, were about 2,000 strong. They called the Schuylkill "Manaiunk," which means "the place where I drink."

That's all now, and with the snow whip-creaming the big pine tree next door, I say Happy January. And, let's put a stamp out "Hero on the Hudson.'' Keystone Connie, 610-933-0669. (Ntryz is a Wall of fame member at an Illinois high school. She teaches writing students in The Writing Academy — Minnesota).

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#2 Jan-22-2009 10:01:am

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

Re: "...a full-blooded American Indian..." LOL

...

Last edited by lenape (Jan-22-2009 10:26:am)

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#3 Jan-22-2009 10:30:am

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11139

Re: "...a full-blooded American Indian..." LOL

neutral neutral

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#4 Jan-22-2009 07:08:pm

NanticokePiney
Member
From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
Registered: Jul-10-2007
Posts: 4214

Re: "...a full-blooded American Indian..." LOL

I smell cat urine....  yikes  neutralneutral


I don't have anger issues...just violent reactions to B.S.
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#5 Jan-22-2009 09:49:pm

Suckachsinheet
Member
Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 980

Re: "...a full-blooded American Indian..." LOL

I can only guess who the other eight Indians were. I'd bet Ray Johnson was among them. And Tobacco, and Two Eagles...

This whole piece seemed more fanciful than factual. Can anyone corroborate her stories?


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#6 Jan-22-2009 10:38:pm

NanticokePiney
Member
From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
Registered: Jul-10-2007
Posts: 4214

Re: "...a full-blooded American Indian..." LOL

Suckachsinheet wrote:

Can anyone corroborate her stories?

Not without something Psychoactive. yikes


I don't have anger issues...just violent reactions to B.S.
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#7 Jan-23-2009 09:29:am

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

Re: "...a full-blooded American Indian..." LOL

Suckachsinheet wrote:

Can anyone corroborate her stories?

When I met her she was Jewish, with a drop of "Iroquois", hmmm, guess over the years that Jewish blood transformed.  However she and Ray Johnson claim to be related so then, LOL, he, he, he, LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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#8 Jan-23-2009 11:10:am

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11139

Re: "...a full-blooded American Indian..." LOL

lenape wrote:

Suckachsinheet wrote:

Can anyone corroborate her stories?

When I met her she was Jewish, with a drop of "Iroquois", hmmm, guess over the years that Jewish blood transformed.  However she and Ray Johnson claim to be related so then, LOL, he, he, he, LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Just quote stalking is all. tongue

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#9 Jan-23-2009 07:30:pm

NanticokePiney
Member
From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
Registered: Jul-10-2007
Posts: 4214

Re: "...a full-blooded American Indian..." LOL

lenape wrote:

Suckachsinheet wrote:

Can anyone corroborate her stories?

When I met her she was Jewish, with a drop of "Iroquois", hmmm, guess over the years that Jewish blood transformed.  However she and Ray Johnson claim to be related so then, LOL, he, he, he, LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I heard that too. She said she was part Seneca.


I don't have anger issues...just violent reactions to B.S.
---------------------------------------------------
      Warning:  Some Profanity
This might cause you to experience reason

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#10 Jan-23-2009 07:51:pm

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11139

Re: "...a full-blooded American Indian..." LOL

Cornplanter- to be exact.

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#11 Jan-23-2009 07:57:pm

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

Re: "...a full-blooded American Indian..." LOL

tree hugger wrote:

Cornplanter- to be exact.

LOL, was thinking back to when she told a crowd of her flunkies stories about living on the "Cornplanter Seneca Reservation", LOL..., maybe being under water for such a long time gave her brain damage!!!

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