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#1 Jun-13-2010 02:18:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4396

Map of Delaware dialects

This is a very good map showing where, to the best of our present knowledge, the major dialects of Delaware were spoken in the 17th-century.  It is, essentiallly, a colored, German language copy of the map prepared by Ives Goddard of the Smithsonian Institution. 


/pb.php?url=http://i119.photobucket.com/albums/o128/RayWhritenour/Delaware01.png


The only tweek I'd make to this map, at this time, would be to move the boundary between Northern Unami/Unalachtgo and Southern Unami about six miles to the southwest.  If you were to draw a straight line from Feasterville, Pennsylvania to Forked River, New Jersey, that will show you where I believe this boundary should be. 

The difficulty in determining the boundary between Northern Unami and Unalachtgo arises from the fact that, from what we know of Unalachtgo, it was very, very similar to Northern Unami, and that speakers of these dialects lived in close proximity to each other.  Most likely, the boundary did not run NW > SE, like the other boundaries.

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#2 Jun-13-2010 09:42:pm

tree hugger
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Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11122

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

Thank you Sir. smile

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#3 Jun-13-2010 10:15:pm

Suckachsinheet
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Registered: Sep-11-2007
Posts: 978

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

So, where were the Lenopi? big_smilebig_smile

Seriously, that's a great map.

Last edited by Suckachsinheet (Jun-13-2010 10:16:pm)


It's in the blood; I can't let go. - Robbie Robertson

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#4 Jun-14-2010 12:32:pm

NanticokePiney
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From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
Registered: Jul-10-2007
Posts: 4214

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

Suckachsinheet wrote:

So, where were the Lenopi? big_smilebig_smile

........and the Chiconiconicon Chief-tancy yikes

Honestly, looking at that map, I would theorize that the Meadowood Culture carried in the Proto-Unami language when they came down from New York.


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#5 Jun-14-2010 12:54:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4396

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

Hmmm...  Not sure.  Linguistics says all these dialects appear to descend from a single mother-tongue designated as "Common Delaware," which was still being spoken around 1000 A.D.

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#6 Jun-14-2010 05:48:pm

NanticokePiney
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From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
Registered: Jul-10-2007
Posts: 4214

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

This is one of the few instances where archaeology and linguistics don't mesh.
The original archaic inhabitants which evolved into the Bushkill Complex "may have" spoke a  Proto-Siouian or Iroquoian language. The last vestiges being the Shenks Ferry Culture.
The Adena-Middlesex people "most definately" brought the Southeastern/Central Algonquian ( including the Nanticoke) language to the East.
  First came the Orient Phase from New York during the Early Woodland. Then the Meadowood also came down from New York around the same time period. The origins of the Fox Creek Culture during the Middle Woodland is undetermined. The Kipp Island seems to have centered in New York. Laurentian Artifacts probably came into the Delaware Valley through trade.
  It almost seems like New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Southern New York was the "mix and mingle" between Northern and Southern/Central Algonquian Cultures with South Jersey and Delaware showing stronger Southern Algonquian traits (from a archaeological standpoint) and New York showing much more Northern traits during the Late Woodland.
Do you think "Common Delaware" came out of that "mixing bowl" ?


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#7 Jun-14-2010 07:06:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4396

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

NP writes:

"Do you think 'Common Delaware' came out of that 'mixing bowl'?"

I'm really not well-versed enough in archaeology to know the answer to that question.  However, one always has to wonder whether these various apparent cultural innovations represent the movements of peoples or simply the spread of ideas.

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#8 Jun-14-2010 10:26:pm

NanticokePiney
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From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
Registered: Jul-10-2007
Posts: 4214

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

Somebody had to come in and spread the ideas. yikes


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#9 Jun-14-2010 10:46:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4396

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

NanticokePiney wrote:

Somebody had to come in and spread the ideas. yikes

The domestication and consumption of maize, for instance, spread from Mexico to New Jersey.  There is no evidence, that I know of, that it came in any other way than being passed along from one tribe to the next, until it arrived.  A pottery or projectile point style could be introduced by no more than a single captive or tradesman; or, be brought back by a traveller.

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#10 Jun-15-2010 02:02:am

NanticokePiney
Member
From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
Registered: Jul-10-2007
Posts: 4214

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

sschkaak wrote:

NanticokePiney wrote:

Somebody had to come in and spread the ideas. yikes

The domestication and consumption of maize, for instance, spread from Mexico to New Jersey.  There is no evidence, that I know of, that it came in any other way than being passed along from one tribe to the next, until it arrived.  A pottery or projectile point style could be introduced by no more than a single captive or tradesman; or, be brought back by a traveller.

You mean the Maya didn't visit Jersey????yikes DAMN! There goes that theory.......Then again....maybe it's like McCutchen says......The Lenape grew corn on the Columbian Plateau.....after fighting the Proto-Chinese..........yikes


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#11 Jun-17-2010 05:05:pm

Pepaxkang
Member
Registered: Nov-25-2008
Posts: 65

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

Awesome map. Although where are the Wampano dialects (as represented in those few hymns), lol? I guess not enough is known about them and how to classify them.

Maybe because it's where I live, but Munsee/Mahican relations in the 17th-18th century as shown by shared land deeds always fascinated me (I'm staring at the northern edge of the Munsee language area on the map, just south of Catskill Creek and basically along the Roeliff Jansen Kill.)

Justin

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#12 Jun-17-2010 05:07:pm

Pepaxkang
Member
Registered: Nov-25-2008
Posts: 65

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

BTW Sschkaak, I love your new picture/avatar/whatever it is, lol. (I haven't been on here in forever, I've been taking a sort of break from computers!)

Justin

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#13 Jun-17-2010 07:14:pm

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4396

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

Justin writes:

"Awesome map. Although where are the Wampano dialects (as represented in those few hymns), lol? I guess not enough is known about them and how to classify them."

On the map, if you look at "Schaghticoke," in Connecticut--right near the New York boundary line--that is the exact place where those hymns were written.

Last edited by sschkaak (Jun-17-2010 07:15:pm)

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#14 Jun-17-2010 07:20:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4396

Re: Map of Delaware dialects

Pepaxkang wrote:

BTW Sschkaak, I love your new picture/avatar/whatever it is, lol. (I haven't been on here in forever, I've been taking a sort of break from computers!)

Justin

Thank you!  I've always been very photogenic.

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