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#1 Jan-25-2007 05:25:pm

bls926
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From: Texas
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Cherokee Heritage Center

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#2 Feb-07-2007 07:11:am

bls926
Administrator
From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Cherokee Heritage Center

Cherokee Heritage Center to Offer Southeastern Beadwork Class


PARK HILL, Okla. – The Cherokee Heritage Center is offering a two-day class in traditional southeastern woodland style beadwork on Friday, Feb. 9, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., and Saturday, Feb. 10, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Master craftsman Martha Berry, a Cherokee Nation tribal citizen from Tyler, Texas, will instruct the class. Her work has been recognized and awarded at the national level, and has been featured in Native Peoples and Southwest Art magazines.

Designed to provide an introduction to the nearly lost traditional techniques of Cherokee style beadwork, the class is part of a series of cultural classes offered by the Cherokee Heritage Center. Participants will learn the history of southeastern beadwork and stitches while creating their own beading project.

The Cherokee Heritage Center offers classes, lectures and workshops in local history, crafts, games, and native living year round to the public. Additional classes planned for spring 2007 include Cherokee basketry, stickball making and southeastern pottery. Contact the Cherokee Heritage Center for the complete schedule.

Early registration for the beadwork class is recommended as class size is limited. The $65 fee includes tuition and materials.

For more information or to register, contact the Cherokee Heritage Center’s Education Department at (918) 456-6007 or education@cherokeeheritage.org, or visit their website at www.cherokeeheritage.org.

http://www.cherokee.org/home.aspx?secti … pUvry+Ukw=

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#3 Feb-07-2007 07:16:am

bls926
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From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Cherokee Heritage Center

Cherokee Heritage Center to Host Pottery Exhibition

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Honoring the time-honored tradition of Cherokee art, the Cherokee Heritage Center will feature the Cherokee Pottery: People of One Fire exhibit beginning on Tuesday, February 1 and will continue through April 22. A special reception to celebrate its opening will be held on Friday, February 2, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Admission to the reception is free.

“This exhibition is a retrospective look at Cherokee ceramics as an art form that has manifested itself in changing ways in response to changes in needs, as well as available materials and techniques, yet has remained distinctly Cherokee,” said Carey Tilley, Executive Director of the Cherokee Heritage Center. “This is a very exciting exhibit because it offers an opportunity to explore the archaeological evidence from the prehistoric uses in the eastern homelands of the Cherokees, not to mention continuity and divergence as it evolved in separate tracks in North Carolina and Oklahoma after the Trail of Tears.”

The exhibition features a collection of visually stunning and culturally significant pottery that spans changes in culture throughout Cherokee history. Organized and circulated by the Cherokee National Museum, the exhibition marks the first time Cherokee master artisans from different areas of Cherokee culture have collaborated together to share pottery with the public.

“Cherokee pottery is an honored tradition that brings skilled artisans together in order to preserve the Cherokee craftsmanship passed down from generation to generation,” said Mickel Yantz, exhibit Curator. The Cherokee Heritage Center strives to educate visitors on all aspects of Cherokee history and culture. Permanent exhibitions are continuously available that examine historical information regarding the heritage of the Cherokees.

For more information, contact (918) 456-6007 or visit www.CherokeeHeritage.org .


http://www.cherokee.org/home.aspx?secti … sTLc0Qab0=

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#4 Apr-19-2007 07:16:am

bls926
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From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Cherokee Heritage Center

Heritage Center opens Cherokee pottery history exhibit

By Will Chavez

PARK HILL, Okla. – Cherokee potters and the public gathered Feb. 17 at the Cherokee Heritage Center to celebrate the history of Cherokee-style pottery and to celebrate a new era in Cherokee pottery.

The celebration was part off the CHC exhibit titled “Cherokee Pottery: People of One Fire,” which features a collection culturally significant pottery made by the Cherokee people spanning centuries of dramatic cultural change. The exhibit features nearly 90 pieces and runs through April 22.

“Tonight was a huge success having so many of the artists and so many community patrons come out and really experience and learn about southeastern pottery,” Mickel Yantz, CHC Museum curator, said. “We’re very honored to have people come out and to have the artists’ support. For every everyone to meet the artists next to their artwork is a wonderful opportunity.”

The exhibit marks the first time Cherokee master artisans from different areas of Cherokee culture have collaborated together to share pottery with the public. After leaving the CHC, the exhibit will go to the Red Earth Museum in Oklahoma City then to the Five Points Museum in Cleveland, Tenn., and finally to three locations in North Carolina for 2008.

Yantz said the exhibit’s pottery started from pottery shards found in the southeastern United States. Cherokee artists today use the patterns found on some of the shards to design their pottery. Yantz said funding was gathered to bring Cherokee, N.C., potter Joel Queen and southeastern pottery expert Tammy Bean of Collinsville, Ala., to Tahlequah in 2006 to teach 10 experienced Cherokee potters different pottery techniques. The potters learned the coil method of stacking coils of clays to form pottery and different pottery decoration designs.

Some of the designs were recently discovered in the journal of a British officer who visited the Cherokee in the 1700s, but most of the designs were taken from pottery shards, Queen said.

“Basically it was just getting the old designs to people, and they took off with it very well,” he said. “It’s unfortunate we don’t know what the designs mean, but at least we have access to them again, and we can reproduce them.”

Cherokee potter Lisa Rutherford of Tahlequah said the idea for the pottery collaboration came after eastern and western Cherokee artists met at a Qualla Boundary pottery conference in Cherokee, N.C., in 2005. She said she was intrigued by the conference because the instructors were sharing true Cherokee pottery designs. Rutherford and Cherokee potter/instructor, Jane Osti of Tahlequah, met Queen and Bean at the conference and made plans for them to come to Tahlequah to teach the weeklong pottery class in February 2006.

During the class in Tahlequah, the idea came about to have a pottery exhibit, which Yantz took the lead on and made happen, Rutherford said.

“This started with an act of kindness, an act of sharing, and ancestors and generations sharing with each other,” Yantz said. “Cherokee pottery is an honored tradition that brings skilled artisans together in order to preserve the Cherokee craftsmanship passed down from generation to generation.”

Cherokee potter Anna Mitchell attended the reception and said she was impressed with the numerous pottery pieces on display. In the 1960s, she was one of very few Cherokee artists who were working to bring back southeastern and Cherokee-style pottery. Many Cherokee artists give her credit for the research and work she did then to bring Cherokee pottery in Oklahoma back from near extinction.

“I didn’t think it would come to this. I didn’t realize at the time it would work out this way, but I just I felt like it was worthwhile to me keep up the tradition,” she said.
Mitchell said she thought the exhibit shows off the history and tradition of Cherokee pottery well.

“I’m very impressed especially with fact we have a lot of old pieces, the things I researched and saw, they have brought out and incorporated. I think Tammy Bean has done a wonderful job in that research too, and she’s a very good potter,” Mitchell said. “I think finally after all these years we are coming together and showing people our southeastern culture, which has always been there, but it’s finally raising its head.”

For more information about the exhibit call (918) 456-6007 or toll free 1-888-999-6007 or visit www.CherokeeHeritage.org.


/pb.php?url=http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q129/bls926/Cherokee/CherokeePottery.jpg
Pottery created by various Cherokee artists on display at the Cherokee Heritage Center. (Photo by Will Chavez)


http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/arts/arts.aspx

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#5 May-30-2007 02:08:pm

bls926
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From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Cherokee Heritage Center

Cherokee Heritage Center to Offer Traditional Mask Class

/pb.php?url=http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q129/bls926/Cherokee/Heri-center-pillars.jpg


PARK HILL, Okla. – The Cherokee Heritage Center is offering a class in traditional Cherokee masks on Saturday, May 19, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Designed to provide an introduction to the traditional techniques of Cherokee mask making, the class is part of a series of cultural classes offered by the Cherokee Heritage Center. Participants will learn the history of Cherokee masks, how they were used and how to make their own mask.

Master craftsman Roger Cain will instruct the class. Cain researches much of his work from museum collections of ancient Cherokee masks, scholarly publications and especially from living elders who still remember the art and use of masks among the Cherokee. After 20 years, Cain says he has come full circle in understanding the connection of the art “product” with its significance to Cherokee history and culture. It is through his relations with his elders, natural woodland environment and Cherokee lineage that Cain says he draws his inspiration to create art forms reflecting his personal perspectives and expressions as a Cherokee in the 21st century.

A partial list of additional classes planned for 2007 include stone carving, Cherokee basketry, Cherokee pottery and loom weaving. Contact the Cherokee Heritage Center for the complete schedule.

Early registration for the mask-making class is recommended as class size is limited. The $40 fee includes tuition and materials.

For more information or to register for the class, contact the Cherokee Heritage Center’s Education Department at (918) 456-6007, or by email: education@cherokeeheritage.org

http://www.cherokee.org/home.aspx?secti … SY4yDreRA=

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#6 May-30-2007 02:10:pm

bls926
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From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Cherokee Heritage Center

Cherokee Heritage Center to Offer Stone Carving Class

PARK HILL, Okla. – The Cherokee Heritage Center is offering a class in traditional Cherokee stone carving on Saturday, June 9, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Cherokee Heritage Center.

The class, which will be taught by Cherokee stone carver Harry Oosahwee, is designed to provide an introduction to the traditional techniques of Cherokee stone carving. In addition to hands-on carving work, participants will also learn about the types of stones, their uses and the historical background associated with the Cherokee people and carving stone.

The stone carving class is part of a series of cultural classes offered by the Cherokee Heritage Center. A partial list of additional classes planned for 2007 include Cherokee basketry, Cherokee pottery, loom weaving and blowgun making. Contact the Cherokee Heritage Center's Education Department for a complete list of all the remaining classes for 2007.

Early registration is recommended as class size is limited. The $40 fee includes tuition and materials.

For more information or to register for the class, contact the Cherokee Heritage Center’s Education Department at (918) 456-6007 or email education@cherokeeheritage.org

http://www.cherokee.org/home.aspx?secti … d0NCQOCiU=

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#7 May-29-2008 10:01:am

bls926
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From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Cherokee Heritage Center

Cherokee Heritage Center Press Release

May 23, 2008

Museum Store Receives Major Renovation

The Cherokee Heritage Center museum store opens Memorial Day weekend with a new look. The store, which serves as the main entrance to the museum, underwent a $90,000 renovation this month to create a gallery-like display for Cherokee art and artifacts available for purchase. The renovation is part of a two-phase construction and redesign project for the Cherokee Heritage Center located in Tahlequah, Okla.

“Part of what we do here at Cherokee Nation Enterprises is help restore and revive our Cherokee history and culture, which is prominently put on display at each of our Cherokee Casino locations,” said David Stewart, CEO of Cherokee Nation Enterprises, which operates Cherokee Casinos and multiple other retail businesses, like the heritage center museum store. “We have many other businesses and departments that work outside of the casino, helping to promote the Cherokee Nation and its culture. The heritage center is a long-time example, and we were happy to be a part of the redesign.”

The project was a design of Resource Design out of Rogers, Ark., with construction headed by Takoda Development, a Ponca City-based company.

“The heritage center is a place of history, education and cultural pride for an entire nation. The goal of the redesign of the heritage center’s museum store was to allow the culture of the Cherokee Nation to be displayed through their art, literature and hand-crafted keepsakes while creating a fluid transition to the heritage museum. This contemporary and fluid environment is created with the use of custom fixtures, etchings and other subtle visuals throughout the facility, offering visitors insight into the Cherokee history and culture,” said David Hook, senior designer of Resource Design.

The Cherokee Heritage Center is governed by the Cherokee National Historical Society, Inc., a non-profit organization, and is operated with significant support from the Cherokee Nation and Cherokee Nation Enterprises. It has served as a national historical and cultural preservation site for the Cherokee Nation since its living village opened in 1967, followed by the museum and gift shop in 1974. The concept of this redesign was to create better continuity between the retail space and the heritage museum, while still capturing the essence of Cherokee culture as with the original design of the structure.

Phase two of the heritage center construction and redesign plan will include a new parking lot and aesthetic renovations to the atrium and restrooms.

The Cherokee Heritage Center museum store houses Cherokee art, artifacts, books, prints, jewelry, apparel, apparel accessories and souvenirs for guests to purchase.

For more information about the Cherokee Heritage Center, visit http://www.cherokeeheritage.org or www.cherokeetourismok.com; or call (888) 999-6007.

http://www.cherokee.org/PressRoom/Story.aspx?id=2592

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#8 Jun-30-2008 10:13:am

bls926
Administrator
From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Cherokee Heritage Center

Cherokee Nation journalism featured in new exhibition

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/images/stories/stories29031_md.jpg
Phoenix Rising: Celebrating 180 years of Cherokee Journalism

By Staff Reports
5/30/2008 7:32:48 AM (CST)

PARK HILL, Okla. – The history of Cherokee Nation journalism is being told in a new exhibition titled “Phoenix Rising: Celebrating 180 years of Cherokee Journalism” that will premiere on May 31 at the Cherokee Heritage Center.

It will be on view through Aug. 10.

On Feb. 21, 1828, the original Cherokee Phoenix – the first Native American newspaper and the first bilingual newspaper in the Western Hemisphere – was published at New Echota, Cherokee Nation, now Georgia.

The first editor was Elias Boudinot, who took his name from the man who sponsored his education in Connecticut where he learned about the phoenix bird of Egyptian mythology that consumes itself in fire and is reborn from the flames. The phoenix analogy has proved appropriate, as Cherokee tribal newspapers have begun, then ceased publication for different reasons and been reborn under various titles.

After the forced removal from their southeastern homeland, the Cherokee Nation published the Cherokee Advocate, the first newspaper in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma, on Sept. 26, 1844.

Today, the new Cherokee Phoenix is published by the Cherokee Nation and mailed free of charge to more than 30,000 Cherokee households in which at least one Cherokee citizen has requested to be on the mailing list

Through reproductions of those and other official tribal publications, as well as the photos and material from the Cherokee Heritage Center archives, that history will be exhibited on a series of panels that will form a circle around an interactive newsroom staffed by Cherokee Phoenix journalists.

A section of the exhibit will be devoted to the development and enactment of the Cherokee Independent Press Act of 2000, also known as the Cherokee free press act.

The Cherokee Heritage Center is located three miles south of downtown Tahlequah, Okla. To get to there, drive south on Highway 62 and turn left on Willis Rd., which will curve into S. Keeler Dr., and follow the signs to the entrance.

For more information, call (918) 456-6007 or 888-999-6007.

http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/News/New … oryID=2903

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