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#1 Feb-28-2009 01:09:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
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Jim Revey's obituary

This obituary appeared in the ASNJ Newletter, Vol. 183 (October, 1998), pages 1 & 2.  [It should have read "3" parts Delaware--not "4."  Just a typo.] 

     On May 18, 1998 New Jersey lost one of its most informed, dedicated and outspoken Native Americans.  James "Lone Bear" Revey was a full blooded (4 parts Delaware, 1 part Cherokee) Indian and member of the Sand Hill Delaware band, formerly located in Monmouth County.  He was the appointed New Jersey representative of, and spokesperson for, the Federally recognized Delaware Tribe of Indians, and was devoted to the preservation of his people's heritage.  To this end he spent most of his adult life as genealogical consultant, researcher, author and lecturer on the Lenape or Delaware people.  Mr. Revey served on the New Jersey Indian Commission and was consultant to several museums including the State Museum of Pennsylvania, the Indian Village at Waterloo and the Mashantucket Pequot Indian Museum.  He headed the "New Jersey Indian Office" and was proprietor of "Lone Bear Indian Crafts" in Orange, New Jersey, which made artifacts and articles of ceremonial attire for Museums, the Broadway Stage (e.g., "Singing in the Rain"), for Indian ceremonial performances and other events.  Mr. Revey was a popular and much sought after speaker in elementary schools throughout the State, while also giving scholarly presentations for historical societies and universities.  His written articles were published by Seton Hall University Museum, and the Moravian Historical Society.  Mr. Revey was 74 years old.  *"Lone Bear" was buried on June 30th at Hillside Cemetery in South Plainfield in a simple, traditional Lenape Indian ceremony.  David Oestreicher and Herb Kraft participated and represented the Archaeological Society of New Jersey.  On Saturday, September 19th a memorial service was held at the Senior Citizens Center in the Municipal complex in Old Bridge (Middlesex County).  Here he was eulogized by colleagues, relatives and friends who cherished their association with this distinguished individual.
     It is unlikely that anyone will take Jim Revey's place.  He had an extensive knowledge of Delaware and Cherokee genealogy and willingly took the time to help people discover their heritage.  He had a passion for Native American history but rarely had the time to put his thoughts in writing.  He endeavored to protect his Delaware Indian heritage and was offended by and opposed many of the so-called "wannabees" who claimed Lenape/Delaware ancestry on tenuous evidence, and who promulgated misinformation, and enacted dances and rituals that were inaccurate.  Who will assume these responsibilities now? 
     Rest in peace, Jim.  It was an honor & a privilege to have known you.

Herb

(We thank Herb Kraft for writing this obituary for us.  Ed.)

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#2 Mar-20-2009 06:56:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4424

Re: Jim Revey's obituary

The statement that Jim was "full blooded" isn't quite accurate.  While he did have four Indian grandparents, there was some distant Dutch and Spanish ancestry, as well.

Last edited by sschkaak (Feb-17-2011 07:52:am)

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#3 Mar-20-2009 07:39:pm

NanticokePiney
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From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
Registered: Jul-10-2007
Posts: 4214

Re: Jim Revey's obituary

sschkaak wrote:

The statement that Jim was "full blooded" isn't quite accurate.  While he did have four Indian grandparents, there was some distant Dutch and Spanish ancestry, as well.

There's a lot of that among "full bloods". My father was a "full blood" but there were several Quakers and former African slaves in his ancestry.


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#4 Apr-23-2009 07:54:pm

Chevy
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Registered: Aug-01-2007
Posts: 1577

Re: Jim Revey's obituary

Thanks, sschkaak for posting that, although I'm just now reading it.

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#5 Feb-17-2011 07:54:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4424

Re: Jim Revey's obituary

sschkaak wrote:

The statement that Jim was "full blooded" isn't quite accurate.  While he did have four Indian grandparents, there was some distant Dutch and Spanish ancestry, as well.

Also, some African-American ancestry, in the mix.

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#6 Nov-16-2011 09:05:am

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4424

Re: Jim Revey's obituary

ANOTHER:

Paper: Star-Ledger, The (Newark, NJ)
Title: James L.B. Revey, leader of Lenapes
Date: September 15, 1998

OBITUARY

A memorial service for James Lone Bear Revey of Orange, a Delaware Lenape Indian, who headed the New Jersey Indian Office, will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday in the George J. Bush Human Service Center (Old Bridge Senior Center), Route 516 and Cottrell Road, Old Bridge. Arrangements are by the Waitt Funeral Home, Morganville.

Mr. Revey died May 18 in the East Orange General Hospital.

He owned and operated the Lone Bear Indian Craft Co., Orange, for 48 years until the time of his death. He made Native American artifacts and ceremonial attire for museums, plays and musicals, including "Singing In the Rain."

A Delaware Lenape Indian, he was the chairman of the New Jersey Indian Office for the Delaware Lenape Nation in Orange for more than 24 years.

Mr. Revey also was the designated state representative and spokesman for the federally- recognized Delaware tribe. He was a genealogical consultant, researcher, author and lecturer on the Delaware Lenape Tribe, New Jersey's first settlers.

Mr. Revey gave presentations about his heritage to state universities, museums and other educational and historical institutions throughout New Jersey.

He worked closely with professor Herbert Kraft of Seton Hall University in South Orange on numerous projects and was a consultant to several museums, including the State Museum of Pennsylvania and the Indian Village at Waterloo.

His written articles were published by the Seton Hall University Museum, the Archaeological Society of New Jersey and the Moravian Historical Society of Nazareth, Pa.

Mr. Revey was a graduate of Bacone College, Muskogee, Okla.

Born in Asbury Park, he moved to Orange in 1973.

Surviving is a sister, Mercedes.

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#7 Nov-18-2011 03:17:pm

ramapoughnative
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Registered: Sep-10-2007
Posts: 187
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Re: Jim Revey's obituary

Interesting how there no mention of Holloway being put in charge after Lonebear. To be honest, why would he have? Holloway is not like by the Cherokees (he's listed as a fraud on their website) and i'm sure the Western Delaware have no idea about him. Yet, he keeps trying to weasel his way in as someone of authority. Sickening.


Everything I do is for my grandmother for without her, I wouldn't be here today.

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#8 Nov-18-2011 03:19:pm

ramapoughnative
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Re: Jim Revey's obituary

Also, just out of curiosity, were there any tribes that attended Lonebear's funeral?


Everything I do is for my grandmother for without her, I wouldn't be here today.

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#9 Nov-18-2011 03:46:pm

sschkaak
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Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4424

Re: Jim Revey's obituary

ramapoughnative wrote:

Interesting how there no mention of Holloway being put in charge after Lonebear. To be honest, why would he have? Holloway is not like by the Cherokees (he's listed as a fraud on their website) and i'm sure the Western Delaware have no idea about him. Yet, he keeps trying to weasel his way in as someone of authority. Sickening.

It's my understanding that Sam Beeler succeeded Lone Bear.  Holloway succeeded Sam.  And, I imagine that Lone Bear would have been listed as a fraud by the CNO, had he lived long enough to come to their notice.

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#10 Nov-18-2011 03:51:pm

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4424

Re: Jim Revey's obituary

ramapoughnative wrote:

Also, just out of curiosity, were there any tribes that attended Lonebear's funeral?

I don't know the answer to that.  I know it was "family and friends," but whether this included any Indians other than the Sand Hill Indians, I don't know.  I wasn't invited and didn't hear about it until after the fact.  I know he was buried with a hole sawed through the coffin, which was smeared with red paint (olaman), in the traditional Lenape way.

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