Woodland Indians Forum

You are not logged in.

Announcement

#1 Jun-02-2008 11:36:am

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

Language preservation....

A campaign to save American Indian languages
As many American Indian languages pass away with their last few elderly speakers, so do the unusual worldviews phrases can impart.

By Faye Flam

Inquirer Staff Writer
In the Lakota language, a single word expresses the awe and connectedness with nature that some feel looking at the Northern Lights. In Euchee, the language makes no distinction between humans and other animals, though it does differentiate between Euchee people and non-Euchee.

And the Koasati language of Louisiana provides no word for good-bye, since time is seen as more cyclical than linear. To end a conversation, you would say something like, "This was good."

More than 300 American Indian languages flourished in North America at the time of Columbus, each carrying a unique way of understanding the world.

And despite an often-brutal campaign to stamp them out, more than half of those languages have survived, including the Delaware Valley's Lenape, though the pool of speakers has dwindled.

Can they be saved? Last month, representatives from Indian groups around the country met with linguists and other academics in Philadelphia to see what they could accomplish together.

"We're talking about an emergency situation," said Richard Grounds, a speaker of the Euchee language and co-organizer of the meeting, held at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology.

The youngest person to grow up speaking Euchee as a first language is now 78, said Grounds, a professor at the University of Tulsa. The rest are in their 80s.

Grounds learned from his own family how Indian languages were systematically squelched. His grandmother, he said, grew up speaking Euchee, but, as a teenager, was forced into an English-only boarding school where teachers would wash her mouth out with soap when she uttered a word of her native tongue.

In the last few years, he has been racing to coax all the words and wisdom he can from tribal elders.

And yet, at the meeting, a number of young people spoke and even sang in Euchee, Lenape, Miccosukke, Lakota, Miami, and other endangered languages - something that Grounds said gave him hope.

The situation in North America is part of a worldwide erosion of language diversity. At stake are not just words. For native communities, language embeds traditions, religion, medicine and geography, as well as a more general way of seeing the world.

"It's not only about the use of [medicinal] plants, et cetera, carried in a language," said Grounds, "but literally ways people have of knowing themselves."

Some languages, for example, have no way to give directions using left and right, because their speakers navigate with a less self-centered view of the world than we do, said Leanne Hinton, a linguist at the University of California, Los Angeles. They think more in terms of local geography.

Ryan Wilson, a member of the Oglala Sioux tribe, said the quality his people value most in a man is something like courage, but includes a degree of independence and perseverance. It has no direct English translation, and with the word may go the idea and the reason it once mattered.

Wilson, who is president of the National Alliance to Save Native Languages, said there was also a word that describes the feeling that you cannot live without someone. It is similar to love, but something is lost in that translation.

Languages seem to be going extinct just like species of plants and animals. That comparison holds up pretty well, except that languages can occasionally be brought back to life.

Growing up in Ohio, Daryl Baldwin said he was told that the language of his Miami tribe was already extinct, but he did not accept that. As an adult, he set about digging up all available records and teaching himself.

"It changed the way I thought," he said about learning the language after 29 years of speaking nothing but English.

The Miami language contains wisdom about which foods are healthful - something that today might have helped Indians avoid being disproportionately affected by Type 2 diabetes, Baldwin said. Today, he's working to perpetuate the language as director of a program called the Myaamia Project at Ohio's Miami University.

In the Maskoke language, time and space are seen very differently from Western perception, said Marcus Briggs-Cloud, who is a member of the Maskoke Nation of Florida and a theology graduate student at Harvard. In English, time is more linear, whereas it's more cyclical in Maskoke. There's a cyclical nature to space as well, and some ceremonies focus on the renewal of space.

While the academics see these languages as windows into the human mind, the American Indians see them as a way to reconnect to their heritage and to the ancestors who used them.

"In the next few years, my tribal community will either see our language restored to a new generation, or we will bury it forever in the grave of our last few elderly speakers," said Jacob Manatowa-Bailey, of the Oklahoma-based Sauk language.

Although they seem to have common needs, Grounds said, the academic linguists interested in American Indian language have not always worked in the best interests of the people they study. The academics use funds to catalogue and dissect languages that might have been used to revive them, he said, and linguists sometimes compete for access to the few remaining elders, whose time might be better-spent teaching the language to young people who would use it.

As a member of the Euchee tribe and a historian of religion with a doctorate from the Princeton Theological Seminary, Grounds straddles both worlds. Some of the problem, he said, is a defeatist attitude, in which academics think the best they can do is catalogue languages that are destined to die. "For the community point of view," he said, "this doesn't have much value."

One of the most endangered languages is Lenape - once the dominant language of what's now eastern Pennsylvania, Delaware, and parts of New York and New Jersey. While a few Lenape people remained in this area, most were forced to scatter in various directions - westward to Oklahoma and north into Ontario - and only a tiny fraction of those identifying themselves as Lenape continued to speak the language.

The conference brought Lenape from diverse places. Some of those coming from Canada said they didn't know until relatively recently that there were other Lenape still living in the Delaware Valley.

Shelly DePaul, a teacher and musician in Kunkletown, said she was one of just three fluent Lenape speakers left in Pennsylvania. But now, she said, they are joining forces with Lenape from elsewhere to teach the language to children.

"There didn't seem to be a lot of hope a few decades ago, but now things are reviving," she said. "It's very exciting."

http://www.philly.com/inquirer/health_s … words.html

Offline

 

#2 Jun-02-2008 11:38:am

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

Re: Language preservation....

"Shelly DePaul, a teacher and musician in Kunkletown, said she was one of just three fluent Lenape speakers left in Pennsylvania."
roll

oh boy, now Shelly speaks the Lenape language "fluently"????????????????????????????yikes

Offline

 

#3 Jun-02-2008 01:44:pm

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11139

Re: Language preservation....

But now, she said, they are joining forces with Lenape from elsewhere to teach the language to children.

I'd like to know who? Everyone I talked to that's legit won't get near them.


Once again....






http://www.mazeguy.net/angry/banghead.gif

Offline

 

#4 Jun-02-2008 01:48:pm

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11139

Re: Language preservation....

Uh just clicked on the article and saw the pic. neutral

Offline

 

#5 Jun-02-2008 01:52:pm

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4409

Re: Language preservation....

I've studied Lenape every day (without exaggeration), for the past twenty-five years, and I'm nowhere near being "fluent."   neutral

Offline

 

#6 Jun-02-2008 02:00:pm

bls926
Administrator
From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Language preservation....

sschkaak wrote:

I've studied Lenape every day (without exaggeration), for the past twenty-five years, and I'm nowhere near being "fluent."   neutral

From what I hear, you're a whole lot better than Shelley.

Offline

 

#7 Jun-02-2008 02:16:pm

bls926
Administrator
From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Language preservation....

The conference brought Lenape from diverse places. Some of those coming from Canada said they didn't know until relatively recently that there were other Lenape still living in the Delaware Valley.

I'm sure there are Lenape in the Delaware Valley, but they won't be found among the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania.


Shelly DePaul, a teacher and musician in Kunkletown, said she was one of just three fluent Lenape speakers left in Pennsylvania. But now, she said, they are joining forces with Lenape from elsewhere to teach the language to children.

Wonder how many fluent speakers there are in Pennsylvania. We know Shelley isn't one of them.


"There didn't seem to be a lot of hope a few decades ago, but now things are reviving," she said. "It's very exciting."

It'd be a whole lot more exciting if the truth were being told in Pennsylvania; if academia would start writing about history accurately and quit kissing LNP butt; if Ruth, Beer, DeMund, DePaul, et al would disappear.


LNP's PR guy must be working over-time. They've had too much good press lately. Good in this case does not mean truthful or accurate info. Lenape history with the LNP spin.

Offline

 

#8 Jun-04-2008 02:03:pm

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

Re: Language preservation....

More on the Lenape Language Lie.  I guess a lie told long enough becomes the truth..........roll


http://indiancountrynews.net/index.php? … p;Itemid=5

Lenape host Native American Languages in Crisis conference in Pennsylvania        PDF         Print         E-mail
User Rating: / 0
PoorBest
Native Language - Linguistic Issues and Articles

by Christine Graef
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (NFIC) 6-08

lenape-panel.gif

Chief Bob Red Hawk Ruth took the strings of wampum in his hand and presented one to each of the leaders gathered in the University of Pennsylvania’s Native American Studies language conference in early May

It was a statement of the sincerity of a welcome that renewed friendship in a Lenape (Delaware) Nation that had not come together on homeland since the pounding of 18th century colonialism splintered them into several separate tribes.

“It’s been a long time,” said Red Hawk. “We’ve been hoping for unity for a long time.”

Red Hawk, Chief of the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania and founder of the Red Hawk Singers, was asked by the university to host Native American Languages in Crisis: Exploring the Interface between Academia, Technology and Smaller Native Language Communities.

The three day conference brought together smaller language communities for a wide range of discussion that will be published and sent to nations across North America, the Pennsylvania’s governor’s office, Philadelphia’s mayor and Penn alumni.

“These are the contexts facing the highest threats of language loss and they are the contexts most often with the fewest resources at their disposal,” said conference organizer Dr. Richard Grounds, Director of the Euchee Language Project and a presenter at the recent Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues at the United Nations.

Grounds said that 89 percent of 175 Native languages in North America are in imminent danger of falling silent. In Oklahoma, only four of the remaining 23 languages are being learned by children.
Language workers from the Miccosukke, Chichti Pueblo, Lakota, Miami, Sac and Fox, Apache/Chicana, Yuchi, Euchee, Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian, Snqwiiqwo Salish, Maliseet, Shawnee, Kashaya, Navajo, Munda, Kallawaya, Maori, Sami, Hnahno, Turkic and Lenape/Delaware languages came together to talk of the urgency of revitalization, best practices, new technologies and recognizing the roles of linguists and non-Native educators.

Language workers from the Miccosukke, Chichti Pueblo, Lakota, Miami, Sac and Fox, Apache/Chicana, Yuchi, Euchee, Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian, Snqwiiqwo Salish, Maliseet, Shawnee, Kashaya, Navajo, Munda, Kallawaya, Maori, Sami, Hnahno, Turkic and Lenape/Delaware languages came together to talk of the urgency of revitalization, best practices, new technologies and recognizing the roles of linguists and non-Native educators.

“Language is something everyone can come together about,” and Bruce Stonefish, member of the Moravian Band Delaware Nation in Ontario and Service Manager at the Indigenous Education Coalition.

Stonefish’s doctoral at Harvard University is focusing on curriculum, policy, resource and cultural development in Native communities. He and Glen Jacobs, member of the Delaware Nation in Ontario, co-created the Lunaape Language Immersion Curricula and a camp that promotes opportunity to learn introductory levels of the Algonquian Lenape language. The two men have spent more than a decade re-gathering their language to pass it to others.

Stonefish for years has woven threads to connect the various Lenape/Delaware groups, a hurdle that grafts those with federal recognition to those without it.

We have to work together, he said.

The Lenape’s homeland spanned thousands of acres across New Jersey and Pennsylvania for more than 10,000 years. They were pushed from their homelands to Wisconsin and Kansas, southwest to Oklahoma and northward to Canada.

The English called them Delaware, likely because the people centered around the Lenape Sipu which became called the Delaware River. According to the 2000 U.S. Census, about 16,000 people across America say they are descendants of the Lenape.

Today the restoration of language returns to the people the heart of their identity and traditions.

“Elders talk about boarding school experiences and this younger generation talks about how important it is to them to regain their language,” said Ann Dapice, Lenape/Cherokee from Oklahoma and member of the Pennsylvania Lenape Nation.

People of the Lenape came from the Delaware Nation of Oklahoma, the Moravian Band Delaware Nation in Ontario, the Delaware Nation in Thamesville, Ontario, the Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohicans in Wisconsin and the Delaware Tribe of Indians in Anadarko, Oklahoma.

The Lenape Language Workshop was held on the last day of the conference. Organizer Dapice served on the Elders Council for the American Indian Chamber of Commerce and is a member of the Board of Directors of Mental Health Association in Tulsa and the Tulsa Metropolitan Ministry/Domestic Violence Intervention Services Committee. She is founder and chair of the Penn Association of Native Alumni.

“We shared a variety of experiences and information,” said Dapice. “We reached new understandings about the need for a deeper understanding of the specific challenges, political realities and emotional and physical health that need to be addressed.”

If members are facing hardships and not certain of life tomorrow, learning a language is more difficult, she said. Incorporating unique Native humor into lessons that can be tedious with conjugations was also found to be important.

The Lenape presenters are discussing how to provide Lenape language curriculum to schools in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

Pennsylvania member Shelley DePaul, a state certified teacher, serves as Director of the Lenape Language Program for the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania. DePaul has been teaching Lenape language classes and workshops for the past 10 years. She’s worked on developing Lenape language curricula since 1994.

She said that a 1990s census in Pennsylvania found fewer than 1 percent of the population could speak Lenape fluently.

She said that a 1990s census in Pennsylvania found fewer than 1 percent of the population could speak Lenape fluently. She said one reason is the lack of communication between speakers in a dispersed society. She also said that current courses take an Anglican approach to grammar and structure. To counter this with a wholistic cultural program, DePaul uses games, stories, music and drumming in her language classes. Three years ago she initiated an online forum that provides daily language instruction.

“Separation from place, the combinations of tribes, mixed heritages and the separations from seeing each other visually has had a lot of impact on language and relearning it,” said Dapice.

Facilitating at the event, Robert W. Preucel Director of the Penn Center for Native American Studies and Professor of Anthropology said the conference is leading to talk of other events that all the Lenape/Delaware people can join together and how Penn and other universities in Philadelphia can work together as a consortium to facilitate ongoing communications between Lenape tribes in the U.S. and Canada and provide for annual meetings in Lenapehoking (homeland) to discuss issues of importance to the Lenape people.

“It really does have a way of its own,” said Red Hawk. “We were asked to host the language conference and weren’t sure what would happen. We sent out invitations to all the people.”

The Lenape’s Fourth Crow prophecy talks of the times in history when the people first lived in harmony on the continent, the time of contact with Europeans, the time of going underground to preserve culture because of the bounties on their lives, and the time when people would emerge to work together in respect and seek indigenous knowledge.

An exhibit called “Fulfilling a Prophecy: The Past and Present of the Lenape in Pennsylvania” will open at the Penn Museum on Sept. 13, 2008 co-curated with DePaul, Red Hawk and Anthropology undergraduate Abby Seldin with her advisor, Preucel, who is Gregory Annenberg Weingarten Curator of North America at the Penn Museum.

Many history books say that there were no Lenape in Pennsylvania after the 1800’s, but many had intermarried, many had passed as another race in order to survive. Ceremonies and traditions continued in basements and garages away from society’s eyes.

In recent decades, Lenape people in the region emerged for public education lectures on history and culture at schools, churches, historical societies, youth groups and environmental groups.

Red Hawk said they went to all the people and asked them to look through their possessions for articles pertaining to pre-contact, contact and post-contact to loan to the museum for the exhibition.

“I think in Indian Country, things are changing,” said Red Hawk. “We’re moving back toward doing things in a traditional way and moving away from the things that take up our time and divide us from each other.”

Offline

 

#9 Jun-04-2008 02:26:pm

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11139

Re: Language preservation....

I was all ready to quote parts but... madsad

Offline

 

#10 Jun-04-2008 04:22:pm

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4409

Re: Language preservation....

"...a Lenape (Delaware) Nation that had not come together on homeland since the pounding of 18th century colonialism splintered them into several separate tribes."

There was a conference of the various Delawares at Seton Hall in the '70's; another in the '80's; one at Katonah, NY, in the '80's; and another at Waterloo Village, NJ, in the '90's--and one or two others, if memory serves.


"...the Lenape Sipu..."

That should be 'Lenapei Sipu.'  The final -i cannot be omitted.  (This is not a typo.  I've corrected this usage before.)


"The Lenape presenters are discussing how to provide Lenape language curriculum to schools in Pennsylvania and New Jersey."

This might require close scrutiny.


"...a 1990s census in Pennsylvania found fewer than 1 percent of the population could speak Lenape fluently."

True:  Zero being less than 1 percent.


"The Lenape’s Fourth Crow prophecy..."

This should read, "The Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania's Fourth Crow prophecy..."

Offline

 

#11 Jun-04-2008 04:25:pm

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

Re: Language preservation....

sschkaak wrote:

"...a Lenape (Delaware) Nation that had not come together on homeland since the pounding of 18th century colonialism splintered them into several separate tribes."

There was a conference of the various Delawares at Seton Hall in the '70's; another in the '80's; one at Katonah, NY, in the '80's; and another at Waterloo Village, NJ, in the '90's--and one or two others, if memory serves.


"...the Lenape Sipu..."

That should be 'Lenapei Sipu.'  The final -i cannot be omitted.  (This is not a typo.  I've corrected this usage before.)


"The Lenape presenters are discussing how to provide Lenape language curriculum to schools in Pennsylvania and New Jersey."

This might require close scrutiny.


"...a 1990s census in Pennsylvania found fewer than 1 percent of the population could speak Lenape fluently."

True:  Zero being less than 1 percent.


"The Lenape’s Fourth Crow prophecy..."

This should read, "The Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania's Fourth Crow prophecy..."

big_smile

  I'm telling you, these should be framed!!!

Offline

 

#12 Jun-04-2008 04:46:pm

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11139

Re: Language preservation....

"...a 1990s census in Pennsylvania found fewer than 1 percent of the population could speak Lenape fluently."

True:  Zero being less than 1 percent.

lol

Offline

 

#13 Jun-04-2008 04:57:pm

bls926
Administrator
From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Language preservation....

sschkaak wrote:

"The Lenape’s Fourth Crow prophecy..."

This should read, "The Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania's Fourth Crow prophecy..."

Google of "Fourth Crow prophecy" brings up one item.

News From Indian Country - Lenape host Native American Languages ...The Lenape’s Fourth Crow prophecy talks of the times in history when the people first lived in harmony on the continent, the time of contact with Europeans, ...
indiancountrynews.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3615&Itemid=1 - 18 hours ago -

What'd they do, make this prophesy up on the spot? Is it an intro to the September exhibit?

An exhibit called “Fulfilling a Prophecy: The Past and Present of the Lenape in Pennsylvania” will open at the Penn Museum on Sept. 13, 2008 co-curated with DePaul, Red Hawk and Anthropology undergraduate Abby Seldin with her advisor, Preucel, who is Gregory Annenberg Weingarten Curator of North America at the Penn Museum.

I'm telling ya, their PR guy is working it!

Offline

 

#14 Jun-04-2008 05:09:pm

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

Re: Language preservation....

bls926 wrote:

sschkaak wrote:

"The Lenape’s Fourth Crow prophecy..."

This should read, "The Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania's Fourth Crow prophecy..."

Google of "Fourth Crow prophecy" brings up one item.

News From Indian Country - Lenape host Native American Languages ...The Lenape’s Fourth Crow prophecy talks of the times in history when the people first lived in harmony on the continent, the time of contact with Europeans, ...
indiancountrynews.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3615&Itemid=1 - 18 hours ago -

What'd they do, make this prophesy up on the spot? Is it an intro to the September exhibit?

An exhibit called “Fulfilling a Prophecy: The Past and Present of the Lenape in Pennsylvania” will open at the Penn Museum on Sept. 13, 2008 co-curated with DePaul, Red Hawk and Anthropology undergraduate Abby Seldin with her advisor, Preucel, who is Gregory Annenberg Weingarten Curator of North America at the Penn Museum.

I'm telling ya, their PR guy is working it!

This has been floating around with these clowns for a while now, has nothing to do with Lenape, just something one of the "mystics" thought up and called it "Tradition"
roll

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LenapeLit/message/1

Neweneit Na Ahas

                                      The Fourth Crow





Lomewe,      luwe       na okwes      xu laxakwihele       xkwithakamika.

Long ago     it was said        a fox            it will be  loosened           on the earth.



Ok nen     luwe,         newa ahasak       xu peyok.

  Also       it was said        four    crows        they will come.



Netamixink na ahas    kenthu       li           guttitehewagan     wichi

The first crow                   he flew     the way of         harmony                with



Kishelemukonk.  Nisheneit na ahas     kwechi    pilitu        entalelemukonk,

  Creator.                   The second crow          he tried   to clean it            the world.



shek        palsu            ok       ankela.   Nexeneit na ahas    weneyoo       

but      he became sick      and       he died.     The third crow            he saw him



ankelek      xansa         ok     koshiphuwe.  Neweneit na ahas    kenthu   

dead          his brother       and         he hid.           The fourth crow            he flew



    li              guttetehewagan  lapi     wichi   Kishelemukonk.   

the way of            harmony           again      with       Creator.                   



Kenahkihechik   xu withatuwak        xkwithakamika.

Caretakers         they will live together         on the earth.

Offline

 

#15 Jun-04-2008 05:13:pm

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4409

Re: Language preservation....

bls writes:

"What'd they do, make this prophesy up on the spot?"

This has been around for a few years, now.

Offline

 

#16 Jun-05-2008 01:26:am

bls926
Administrator
From: Texas
Registered: Oct-21-2006
Posts: 12082

Re: Language preservation....

They must not publicize it much then, cause there's nothing on the internet except that recent article where it's mentioned. At least Google didn't bring any other sites up. Guess that's a good thing.

Offline

 

#17 Jun-16-2008 03:50:pm

lenape
Member
Registered: Feb-11-2008
Posts: 1779

Re: Language preservation....

Another newspaper published the article on the Language Program in Philly;

http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/ … 16-ON.html

Offline

 

#18 Jun-16-2008 03:57:pm

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11139

Re: Language preservation....

Someone make it stop! sad

Offline

 

#19 Jun-16-2008 07:43:pm

NanticokePiney
Member
From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
Registered: Jul-10-2007
Posts: 4214

Re: Language preservation....

lenape wrote:

"Shelly DePaul, a teacher and musician in Kunkletown, said she was one of just three fluent Lenape speakers left in Pennsylvania."
roll

oh boy, now Shelly speaks the Lenape language "fluently"????????????????????????????yikes

Well.............I guess her blend of Northern Unami, Southern Unami and Munsee could be considered..............ehhhhh........fluently mixed.
   This is getting so insane. Ray should of been at that conference. He is the FOREMOST fluent speaker in Lenape.  Yet this liar has weasled her way in.


I don't have anger issues...just violent reactions to B.S.
---------------------------------------------------
      Warning:  Some Profanity
This might cause you to experience reason

Offline

 

#20 Jun-16-2008 08:37:pm

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4409

Re: Language preservation....

NanticokePiney wrote:

lenape wrote:

"Shelly DePaul, a teacher and musician in Kunkletown, said she was one of just three fluent Lenape speakers left in Pennsylvania."
roll

oh boy, now Shelly speaks the Lenape language "fluently"????????????????????????????yikes

Well.............I guess her blend of Northern Unami, Southern Unami and Munsee could be considered..............ehhhhh........fluently mixed.
   This is getting so insane. Ray should of been at that conference. He is the FOREMOST fluent speaker in Lenape.  Yet this liar has weasled her way in.

AHEM!  Well...  Thanks for the vote, but, to be perfectly honest, I am not a fluent speaker.  I am literate.  That is, I completely understand the grammatical structure of the language, and have a very large vocabulary.  In short, I can read and write in the Northern Unami dialect.  I suppose I could "get by," or make myself be understood, if there was anyone alive with whom to speak.  But, no one has spoken NU in many years.  There are four ladies at Moraviantown, Ontario, who, as I understand it, are the only *fluent* speakers now with us.  One is in her 90's, two are in their 80's, and the last is in her 60's.  All speak the Munsee dialect.  The most knowledgeable Southern Unami speaker is the Director of the Lenape Language Project in Bartlesville, OK.  He was invited to this conference, but couldn't make it.

Offline

 

#21 Jun-16-2008 08:53:pm

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11139

Re: Language preservation....

Who's Ray?

Offline

 

#22 Jun-16-2008 09:31:pm

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4409

Re: Language preservation....

tree hugger wrote:

Who's Ray?

I'm so vain!  How embarrassing!  Maybe he meant "Ray Einstein"!  neutral

Last edited by sschkaak (Jun-16-2008 09:36:pm)

Offline

 

#23 Jun-16-2008 10:29:pm

NanticokePiney
Member
From: Hopewell Twp., New Jersey
Registered: Jul-10-2007
Posts: 4214

Re: Language preservation....

sschkaak wrote:

I am literate.  That is, I completely understand the grammatical structure of the language,

Yup! and they don't. Their language is a mish mash.


I don't have anger issues...just violent reactions to B.S.
---------------------------------------------------
      Warning:  Some Profanity
This might cause you to experience reason

Offline

 

#24 Jun-17-2008 06:26:am

tree hugger
Site Admin
Registered: May-12-2006
Posts: 11139

Re: Language preservation....

NanticokePiney wrote:

sschkaak wrote:

I am literate.  That is, I completely understand the grammatical structure of the language,

Yup! and they don't. Their language is a mish mash.

Sorry Ray I was just kidding around. tongue

This whole thing is getting out of hand, I'm sure it's only going to get worse too.

Offline

 

#25 Jun-17-2008 08:26:am

sschkaak
Moderator
Registered: Sep-17-2007
Posts: 4409

Re: Language preservation....

"Sorry Ray I was just kidding around."

So was I.  wink

Offline

 

Board footer

Powered by PunBB
© Copyright 2002–2005 Rickard Andersson